reradiate

re·ra·di·ate

 (rē-rā′dē-āt′)
tr.v. re·ra·di·at·ed, re·ra·di·at·ing, re·ra·di·ates
To radiate (absorbed radiation) after absorbing incident energy.

re·ra′di·a′tion (-ā′shən) n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

reradiate

(riːˈreɪdɪˌeɪt)
vb (tr)
to radiate back out or again (energy which has previously been absorbed)
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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References in periodicals archive ?
That means that the gas and the haze behave very differently in the way they absorb and reradiate energy from the sun.
Carbon dioxide, like other greenhouse gases, can absorb and reradiate infrared light back to Earth.
It also depends on the road surface; the dark surface of the road will reradiate the heat from the sun back towards your car.
Specifically, in urban areas the warming from climate change increases the risk of heat waves by compounding the existing problem of urban heat islands--a result of urban areas being hotter than surrounding rural areas due to more impervious and heat absorbing surfaces that retain and subsequently reradiate incident solar radiation, less vegetation, and more local heat production [2,3].
reradiate long-wave radiation (heat) in all directions.
They also absorb some of Earth's outgoing radiation and then reradiate some of this absorbed energy--which would otherwise be sent into outer space--back to the Earth's surface.
Revelle and Suess 1957) that the particular infrared absorption bands of C[O.sub.2] provide it with a special ability to absorb and reradiate the sun's longer wavelength radiation, causing warming of the troposphere and an increase in high-altitude (cirrus) cloud, further amplifying the heating process.
This temperature differential, which can exceed 10[degrees]C, results from several factors: loss of vegetation with accompanying loss of evapotranspiration; dark surfaces with low albedo (i.e., surface reflectivity), which absorb and then reradiate heat; building configurations that trap heat; and the concentrated generation of heat from generators, vehicles, and other sources (Oke 1982).
The "greenhouse effect" is the well-known process that keeps the Earth's temperature above the -18[degrees]C temperature it would have if greenhouse gases in the atmosphere did not absorb the sun's heat and reradiate it back to the surface.
Those constituents reradiate upwards and downwards, thereby heating the Earth's surface.
"We're relying on objects in the room to absorb the heat and then reradiate that heat outward just like what the sun does with the earth," Caldwell said.