res judicata

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res ju·di·ca·ta

 (rēz′ jo͞o′dĭ-kä′tə, rās′)
n. pl. res ju·di·ca·tae (-kä′tē, -tī)
1. The principle that a decision by a competent court in a case fully and fairly litigated is final and conclusive as to the claims and issues of the parties and cannot be relitigated.
2. A claim or issue that has been decided under this principle.

[Latin rēs iūdicāta, thing decided : rēs, thing + iūdicāta, feminine past participle of iūdicāre, to judge.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

res judicata

(ˈreɪs ˌdʒuːdɪˈkɑːtə) or

res adjudicata

n
(Law) law a matter already adjudicated upon that cannot be raised again
[Latin]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

res ju•di•ca•ta

(ˈriz ˌdʒu dɪˈkeɪ tə, ˈreɪs)
n.
Law.
a thing adjudicated; a case that has been decided.
[1685–95; < Latin]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.res judicata - a matter already settled in court; cannot be raised again
matter, topic, issue, subject - some situation or event that is thought about; "he kept drifting off the topic"; "he had been thinking about the subject for several years"; "it is a matter for the police"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
predecessor publication, Res Judicatae. The journey up one of the perilous ladders that grant access to the upper shelves of the Supreme Court Library was well worth the effort.
The first issue of Res Judicatae appeared in September 1935.
The Review's precursors were The Summons, 'A Magazine of Legal and General Literature' first published in 1891, and Res Judicatae, first published in 1935.
The Melbourne University Law Review, published by the Association, replaced Res Judicatae. Student members of the Association were selected on the basis of academic merit, in line with the prevailing American practice.