res judicata

(redirected from res judicatae)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Legal, Financial, Encyclopedia.

res ju·di·ca·ta

 (rēz′ jo͞o′dĭ-kä′tə, rās′)
n. pl. res ju·di·ca·tae (-kä′tē, -tī)
1. The principle that a decision by a competent court in a case fully and fairly litigated is final and conclusive as to the claims and issues of the parties and cannot be relitigated.
2. A claim or issue that has been decided under this principle.

[Latin rēs iūdicāta, thing decided : rēs, thing + iūdicāta, feminine past participle of iūdicāre, to judge.]

res judicata

(ˈreɪs ˌdʒuːdɪˈkɑːtə) or

res adjudicata

n
(Law) law a matter already adjudicated upon that cannot be raised again
[Latin]

res ju•di•ca•ta

(ˈriz ˌdʒu dɪˈkeɪ tə, ˈreɪs)
n.
Law.
a thing adjudicated; a case that has been decided.
[1685–95; < Latin]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.res judicata - a matter already settled in court; cannot be raised again
matter, topic, issue, subject - some situation or event that is thought about; "he kept drifting off the topic"; "he had been thinking about the subject for several years"; "it is a matter for the police"
References in periodicals archive ?
The first issue of Res Judicatae appeared in September 1935.
Comprised not only of law students but recent graduates, the first issue of Res Judicatae records, surprisingly to modern readers, that the society sought as far as possible at its meetings to observe the procedure of the courts.
Res Judicatae was styled as a 'magazine', but 'the quality of many of its articles .