resegregation

re·seg·re·ga·tion

 (rē-sĕg′rĭ-gā′shən)
n.
Renewal of segregation, as in a school system, after a period of desegregation.

resegregation

(ˌriːsɛɡrɪˈɡeɪʃən)
n
(Sociology) the action or process of resegregating
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
Board of Education, reported on the benefits of integration, argued the pros and cons of forced busing, and documented the recent trend toward resegregation. We've also published pieces on segregation's origins, its civic and cultural implications, its effects on individuals and communities, its potential solutions (from legal remedies to school choice to the redrawing of attendance boundaries), and on and on.
But it's hard to picture how the education revolution he appears to seek can come about if we forgo all of the reforms that he lumps together as "quick fixes." Indeed, he acknowledges that "hundreds of thousands--perhaps millions--of children have benefited from efforts to improve schools [Merrow's emphasis]." But "school reform's record is not great." It hasn't closed achievement gaps, "done much for teachers," or halted resegregation.
The result nationwide, and especially in the South, has been massive resegregation. More than 1 in 3 black students in the southeastern United States today attend schools where at least 90 percent of their peers are minorities, up from 24 percent in 1988.
As in many other cases over the past (http://lawprofessors.typepad.com/education_law/2015/06/fourth-circuit-ends-desegregation-in-pitt-county-nc-signaling-a-more-troubling-trend.html) two decades , the judge conceded to resegregation, speculating that if she stopped the move, innocent parties would suffer: Black students who stayed in Gardendale would be made to feel unwelcome and those legitimately seeking educational improvements would be stymied.
report about a trend: The resegregation of America's public schools.
(25) This inequity is intensified by the resegregation of America's schools.
WE GON' BE ALRIGHT: NOTES ON RACE AND RESEGREGATION BY JEFF CHANG NEW YORK: PICADOR.
The Tampa Bay Times won the 2015 Bingham Prize for "Failure Factories," a multimedia series disclosing how district leaders in Pinellas County, Florida transformed five local elementary schools into some of the state's worst through resegregation and intentional neglect.
It found that "residential resegregation" in some parts of Maryland spilled over into the schools and that in California, the percentage of Hispanics was increasing as the overall school population declined.
This continuing racial divergence in education has been set in social concrete by the exhaustion of busing policies and the acceleration of voluntary resegregation.
He acquires his nickname, "The Sellout," from Foy Cheshire, who objects to Me's resegregation of the city.
Yesterday, Today, and Tomorrow: School Desegregation and Resegregation in Charlotte