reserve bank

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reserve bank

n.
1. A central bank that holds the reserves of other banks.
2. One of the 12 main banks of the US Federal Reserve System.

reserve bank

n
(Banking & Finance) one of the twelve banks forming part of the US Federal Reserve System

reserve′ bank`


n.
1. one of the 12 principal banks of the U.S. Federal Reserve System.
2. a bank authorized by a government to hold the reserves of other banks.
[1900–05]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.reserve bank - one of 12 regional banks that monitor and act as depositories for banks in their regionreserve bank - one of 12 regional banks that monitor and act as depositories for banks in their region
Federal Reserve, Federal Reserve System, FRS, Fed - the central bank of the United States; incorporates 12 Federal Reserve branch banks and all national banks and state-chartered commercial banks and some trust companies; "the Fed seeks to control the United States economy by raising and lowering short-term interest rates and the money supply"
banking company, banking concern, depository financial institution, bank - a financial institution that accepts deposits and channels the money into lending activities; "he cashed a check at the bank"; "that bank holds the mortgage on my home"
References in periodicals archive ?
"The leaders of the Reserve Banks have important jobs and are expected to perform at a high level," said Governor Jerome H.
The Federal Reserve Banks have conducted additional research to inform the roadmap and are seeking feedback on the findings.
Events surrounding the 2007 financial crisis raised questions about the governance of the 12 Federal Reserve Banks (Reserve Banks), particularly the boards of directors' roles in activities related to supervision and regulation.
To some extent, the Reserve Bank's historical policy of maintaining solely hedged reserves was unusual compared to international central Reserve Bank practice, where almost all other central Reserve Banks maintain most, if not all of their foreign reserves on an unhedged basis.
On September 22, 2005, the Federal Reserve Board approved actions by the Boards of Directors of the Federal Reserve Banks of Cleveland, Atlanta, and Dallas, increasing the discount rate at the Banks from 4 1/2 percent to 4 3/4 percent.
As part of their ongoing effort to respond to the significant shift away from the use of paper checks and toward the much greater use of electronic payments, the Federal Reserve Banks will discontinue check processing at the Federal Reserve Bank of New York's East Rutherford Operations Center.
The discount rate is the interest rate banks pay when they borrow from Federal Reserve Banks. Discount rate requests are formally made by the board of directors of the Reserve Banks--not by the Reserve Bank presidents themselves.
New Zealands new monetary policy framework, which comes into effect today, is supported by a handbook developed by the Reserve Bank. Recent amendments to the Reserve Bank Act 1989 saw the addition of an employment objective to the Reserve Banks long-standing price stability objective, and the creation of a formal Monetary Policy Committee with members from both inside and outside the Reserve Bank.
The following list shows the primary components of the Federal Reserve Banks' 2013 net earnings:
These amendments are part of a series of amendments to appendix A that will take place through the first quarter of 2006, associated with the previously announced restructuring of the Reserve Banks' check-processing operations.
The Coalition Government previously expanded the Reserve Banks mandate to support maximum sustainable employment alongside maintaining price stability.
The Reserve Banks had interest expenses of $3.9 billion on depository institutions' reserve balances and term deposits.

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