reserves


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Related to reserves: Military reserves, Bank reserves

re·serve

 (rĭ-zûrv′)
tr.v. re·served, re·serv·ing, re·serves
1. To keep back, as for future use or for a special purpose: The hospital reserves certain drugs for the most serious cases.
2. To set or cause to be set apart for a particular person or use: reserved a seat on the next flight out. See Synonyms at book1.
3. To keep or secure for oneself; retain: I reserve the right to disagree. See Synonyms at keep.
n.
1.
a. Something kept back or saved for future use or a special purpose: a runner with a reserve of energy for the final lap.
b. An amount of capital that is not invested or otherwise used in order to meet probable demands, such as withdrawals by bank depositors or claims on insurance policies.
2.
a. Lack of enthusiasm, as from a misgiving or doubt: supported the idea without reserve.
b. Self-restraint in expression or bearing; reticence or coolness: maintained a dignified reserve throughout the ceremony.
3. A reservation of public land: a forest reserve.
4. An amount of a mineral, fossil fuel, or other resource known to exist in a particular location and to be exploitable: the discovery of large oil reserves.
5.
a. A fighting force kept uncommitted until strategic need arises.
b. The part of a country's armed forces not on active duty but subject to call in an emergency.
c. A member of either of these forces: the army's active reserves.
6. Sports
a. A group of players that play only as substitutes for starters in games or are kept from playing for some reason.
b. One of these players.
adj.
Held in or forming a reserve: a reserve supply of food.
Idiom:
in reserve
Kept back, set aside, or saved.

[Middle English reserven, from Old French reserver, from Latin reservāre, to keep back : re-, re- + servāre, to keep; see ser- in Indo-European roots.]

re·serv′a·ble adj.
re·serv′er n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.reserves - civilians trained as soldiers but not part of the regular armyreserves - civilians trained as soldiers but not part of the regular army
military force, military group, military unit, force - a unit that is part of some military service; "he sent Caesar a force of six thousand men"
armed forces, armed services, military, military machine, war machine - the military forces of a nation; "their military is the largest in the region"; "the military machine is the same one we faced in 1991 but now it is weaker"
SA, Storm Troops, Sturmabteilung - Nazi militia created by Hitler in 1921 that helped him to power but was eclipsed by the SS after 1943
trainband - a company of militia in England or America from the 16th century to the 18th century
territorial reserve, territorial - a territorial military unit
militiaman - a member of the militia; serves only during emergencies
References in classic literature ?
A shell screaming like a storm banshee went over the huddled heads of the reserves.
2) The Convention of London expressly reserves to every nation the right of waging war so long as it does not interfere with the traffic and all that implies.
But "she could never get acquainted with her: she did not know how it was, but there was such coldness and reserve such apparent indifference whether she pleased or notand then, her aunt was such an eternal talker
She could not be silent when such points were introduced, and she had neither shyness nor reserve in their discussion.
Would it be well to reserve the room for the special occupation of Mr.
But with this reserve, I venture to suggest that your remaining in London until to-morrow may possibly lead to other results besides your consultation at my chambers.
The reserve which I have hitherto maintained in this matter has been misinterpreted by members of my family whose good opinion I cannot consent to forfeit.
That summer at Grand Isle she began to loosen a little the mantle of reserve that had always enveloped her.
Having thus provided myself with these maxims, and having placed them in reserve along with the truths of faith, which have ever occupied the first place in my belief, I came to the conclusion that I might with freedom set about ridding myself of what remained of my opinions.
Poor pantaloon, he was not an object to excite love, but the smile in her eyes was affectionate, and it was possible that her reserve concealed a very deep feeling.
He said as much, dryly and quietly, and found himself involved in a discussion, with Joan and Tudor siding against him, in which a more astounding charge than ever he had dreamed of was made against the very English control and reserve of which he was secretly proud.
Helped by the kindness of my friend, I have arranged to have a cabin kept in reserve, on payment of a small deposit.