reshow

reshow

(riːˈʃəʊ)
vb (tr) , -shows, -showing, -showed, -shown or -showed
to show again
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References in periodicals archive ?
"The show halls were full and the audience thanked us about the show and its content, and we submitted requests to reshow the operetta in other governorates," he said.
He needed to reshow us his genius and you would have thought that any sane being in possession of a ticket would have wanted to watch.
A different manner of crime against film began when TV wanted to reshow old Hollywood movies.
Some have surefire ways to open wallets: a museum can hang Monet or Van Gogh or Matisse, an orchestra can program Beethoven, and PBS can quite easily reshow "Yanni at the Acropolis" and "Les Miserables in Concert." But a research library?
"It's ironic really that you're not allowed to reshow controversial incidents on big screens in Premier League grounds yet lots of the fans are able to see it on their iPhones."
"He will get that until people point the finger at them and show the images, reshow the images and have the top pundits speaking about it.
THE second most watched TV channel in the Prentice household* flashed back 25 years this week to reshow a famous Everton victory at Anfield.
"I revisited the show when it was released on DVD and ITV4 also reshowed it in recent years and I'd always kept the series in my mind.
How fitting it would be if the BBC now reshowed the entire Garnett oeuvre, but I suspect the shows are too uncomfortably truthful to suit the PC corporation's taste.