resolute


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res·o·lute

 (rĕz′ə-lo͞ot′, rĕz′ə-lo͞ot′)
adj.
Firm or determined; unwavering.

[Middle English, dissolved, dissolute, from Latin resolūtus, relaxed, past participle of resolvere, to relax, untie; see resolve.]

res′o·lute′ly adv.
res′o·lute′ness n.

resolute

(ˈrɛzəˌluːt)
adj
1. firm in purpose or belief; steadfast
2. characterized by resolution; determined: a resolute answer.
[C16: from Latin resolutus, from resolvere to resolve]
ˈresoˌlutely adv
ˈresoˌluteness n

res•o•lute

(ˈrɛz əˌlut)

adj.
1. firmly set in purpose or opinion; determined; resolved.
2. characterized by firmness and determination.
[1525–35; < Latin resolūtus, past participle of resolvere to resolve]
res′o•lute`ly, adv.
res′o•lute`ness, n.
syn: See earnest1.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.resolute - firm in purpose or belief; characterized by firmness and determination; "stood resolute against the enemy"; "faced with a resolute opposition"; "a resolute and unshakeable faith"
brave, courageous - possessing or displaying courage; able to face and deal with danger or fear without flinching; "Familiarity with danger makes a brave man braver but less daring"- Herman Melville; "a frank courageous heart...triumphed over pain"- William Wordsworth; "set a courageous example by leading them safely into and out of enemy-held territory"
decisive - determining or having the power to determine an outcome; "cast the decisive vote"; "two factors had a decisive influence"
purposeful - serving as or indicating the existence of a purpose or goal
irresolute - uncertain how to act or proceed; "the committee was timid and mediocre and irresolute"
2.resolute - characterized by quickness and firmness; "his reply was unhesitating"
decisive - characterized by decision and firmness; "an able and decisive young woman"; "we needed decisive leadership"; "she gave him a decisive answer"

resolute

resolute

adjective
1. Not hesitating or wavering:
2. Indicating or possessing determination, resolution, or persistence:
3. On an unwavering course of action:
Translations
مُصَمِّم، ثابِت العَزْم
pevnýrázný
beslutsom
sem er staîráîinn í, ákveîinn í

resolute

[ˈrezəluːt] ADJ [person] → resuelto, decidido; [opposition, refusal, faith] → firme
to take resolute actionactuar con resolución or firmeza
I am resolute in my opposition to these proposalsme opongo firmemente a estas propuestas
the government is resolute in countering terrorismel gobierno lucha con firmeza contra el terrorismo

resolute

[ˈrɛzəluːt] adj [person, manner] → résolu(e); [action, opposition, defence] → résolu(e)

resolute

adjenergisch, entschlossen; answer, refusalentschieden, bestimmt; to take resolute actionenergisch vorgehen; to be resolute in somethingentschieden in etw (dat)sein; to be resolute in doing somethingetw mit Entschlossenheit tun

resolute

[ˈrɛzəluːt] adj (frm) → risoluto/a

resolution

(rezəˈluːʃən) noun
1. a firm decision (to do something). He made a resolution to get up early.
2. an opinion or decision formally expressed by a group of people, eg at a public meeting. The meeting passed a resolution in favour of allowing women to join the society.
3. resoluteness.
4. the act of resolving (a problem etc).
ˈresolute (-luːt) adjective
doing what one has decided to do, in spite of opposition, criticism etc. a resolute attitude.
ˈresolutely adverb
ˈresoluteness noun
resolve (rəˈzolv) verb
1. to make a firm decision (to do something). I've resolved to stop smoking.
2. to pass (a resolution). It was resolved that women should be allowed to join the society.
3. to take away (a doubt, fear etc) or produce an answer to (a problem, difficulty etc).
noun
1. determination to do what one has decided to do. He showed great resolve.
2. a firm decision. It is his resolve to become a director of this firm.
resolved (rəˈzolvd) adjective
determined. I am resolved to go and nothing will stop me.

resolute

a. resuelto-a, determinado-a.
References in classic literature ?
Joe's Importance.--The Commander of the Resolute.--Kennedy's Arsenal.--Mutual Amenities.--The Farewell Dinner.--Departure on the 21st of February.--The Doctor's Scientific Sessions.-- Duveyrier.--Livingstone.--Details of the Aerial Voyage.--Kennedy silenced.
The Ox took under his patronage the next term of life, and therefore man in his middle age is fond of work, devoted to labor, and resolute to amass wealth and to husband his resources.
It has been my aim to make the character of "Magdalen," which personifies this struggle, a pathetic character even in its perversity and its error; and I have tried hard to attain this result by the least obtrusive and the least artificial of all means -- by a resolute adherence throughout to the truth as it is in Nature.
We cannot be surprised, therefore, that some of the resolute of his party should feel dismay at the thoughts of adventuring into this perilous wilderness under the uncertain guidance of three hunters, who had merely passed once through the country and might have forgotten the landmarks.
"We are two resolute women--I mean that she is resolute, and that I follow her--and we have asserted our right of dining to our own satisfaction, by means of an interview with the chief cook.
To speak with severe technicality, a ship or a fleet is "brought up" - the complementary words unpronounced and unwritten being, of course, "to an anchor." Less technically, but not less correctly, the word "anchored," with its characteristic appearance and resolute sound, ought to be good enough for the newspapers of the greatest maritime country in the world.
Too much horrified to speak, They can only shriek, shriek, Out of tune, In a clamorous appealing to the mercy of the fire, In a mad expostulation with the deaf and frantic fire, Leaping higher, higher, higher, With a desperate desire, And a resolute endeavor Now - now to sit, or never, By the side of the pale-faced moon.
She had a large, firm, masculine mouth and jaw; prominent, piercing, resolute brown eyes; and thick, coal-black hair, growing unusually low down on her forehead.
His instance is, that for the achieving of a desperate conspiracy, a man should not rest upon the fierceness of any man's nature, or his resolute undertakings; but take such an one, as hath had his hands formerly in blood.
As Indian Moors obey their Spanish lords, So shall the spirits of every element Be always serviceable to us three; Like lions shall they guard us when we please; Like Almain rutters with their horsemen's staves, Or Lapland giants, trotting by our sides; Sometimes like women, or unwedded maids, Shadowing more beauty in their airy brows Than have the white breasts of the queen of love: From Venice shall they drag huge argosies, And from America the golden fleece That yearly stuffs old Philip's treasury; If learned Faustus will be resolute.
Their leader, the famous Endicott, was a man of stern and resolute countenance, the effect of which was heightened by a grizzled beard that swept the upper portion of his breastplate.
Around the gibbets, and particularly at the entrances to the arcade of Saint Jean, moved a noisy mass, a busy mass; daring faces, resolute demeanors were to be seen here and there, mingled with silly faces and indifferent demeanors; signals were exchanged, hands given and taken.