resonantly


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res·o·nant

 (rĕz′ə-nənt)
adj.
1.
a. Strong and deep in tone; resounding: a resonant voice.
b. Having a lasting presence or effect; enduring: "Cranmer compiled the first Book of Common Prayer, writing some of the most resonant phrases in the English tongue" (Allen D. Boyer).
c. Strongly reminiscent; evocative: a monument that is resonant of the nation's past glory.
2. Producing or exhibiting resonance: resonant frequency excitation.
3. Resulting from or as if from resonance: resonant amplification.
n.
Linguistics A sonorant.

[Latin resonāns, resonant-, present participle of resonāre, to resound; see resound.]

res′o·nant·ly adv.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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It was only that Mukhorty, whether to encourage himself or to call for help, had neighed loudly and resonantly. 'Ugh, you wretch!
Each ensemble member sings resonantly - in solo and with fellow performers.
The efficient energy transfer from resonantly excited [Yb.sup.3+] to [Er.sup.3+] and the influence of the Ag NPs contributed to large enhancement of the whole upconverted spectrum.
This can be expected because for the considered wave vectors [k.sub.y] the effective potential [U.sub.eff] has a symmetric multiple barrier structure for the P configuration, where the process of electron motion is resonantly tunneling through these barriers.
In this context Cole resonantly analyzes Woolf's interest in how narration itself may produce aggressive forms of disruption, although the distinction between violence and power, so useful in readings of the Irish Rising or Conrad, seems to fade here, perhaps appropriately, given Woolf's intense concern with power.
The part of the research, based of which CENS was formed, focuses on the theory of double resonance in a sister system of resonantly interacting Rossby waves (Soomere, 1993) which is governed by a three-wave kinetic equation.
Peter Rich's orchestration of space and light resonantly connects the building with site and history, evoking wonder at the memory of so many civilisations that walked the earth before we did.
Every ah in this lesson is to be sung (1) resonantly, (2) with the mouth open the width of two or three fingers, (3) the cheeks and lips relaxed, (4) and the tongue lying motionless in the bottom of the mouth.
With the acoustic canopy lowered, and an austerely-dressed stage focussing attention totally upon the performers, Wednesday's concert from the Takacs Quartet glowed resonantly and richly right from the opening bars of Haydn's C major String Quartet, Op.
Although Nixon hammered the Red Scare pretty resonantly at times, he was careful about direct allegations, and he was finally more instrumental than anyone else in censuring McCarthy in the Senate and assuring his political demise, although he has received little credit for it.
Revered since its 1952 publication for its inventive narrative about a brainy spider's intervention to save the life of a runty barnyard pig, White's tale holds a special place in the hearts of many children and parents because of the way it so gently but resonantly introduces youngsters to the natural cycles of life, from birth to death.