vital capacity

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vital capacity

n.
The amount of air that can be forcibly expelled from the lungs after breathing in as deeply as possible.

vital capacity

n
(Physiology) physiol the volume of air that can be exhaled from the lungs after the deepest possible breath has been taken: a measure of lung function

vi′tal capac′ity



n.
the greatest amount of air that can be forced from the lungs after maximum inhalation.
[1850–55]

vital capacity

The amount of air expelled from the lungs after taking a deep breath.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.vital capacity - the maximum amount of air that can be exhaled after a maximum inhalation (usually tested with a spirometer); used to determine the condition of lung tissue
diagnostic assay, diagnostic test - an assay conducted for diagnostic purposes
capacity, content - the amount that can be contained; "the gas tank has a capacity of 12 gallons"
References in periodicals archive ?
One might suspect that losing one of two lungs would cut respiratory capacity in half, but it doesn't because the human body has significant reserves.
On one hand, the respiratory capacity and the cellular ATP levels are reduced, both key tasks of the mitochondrion, the powerhouse of the cell At the same time, all cells without HSP60 presented changes.
Indeed, VOCs exposure may affect health (irritations, reduced respiratory capacity, olfactory pollution; some VOCs are also considered to be carcinogens) and the environment (an early factor in ozone formation, greenhouse gases, and the formation of secondary particles).
Mitochondrial spare respiratory capacity is regarded as an important aspect of mitochondrial function and is defined as the difference between basal ATP production and its maximal activity.
Babies with type I SMA are at very high risk of irreversible decline in respiratory capacity.
For these purposes, the equipment will consist primarily of a garment designed to offer full waterproofing, thermal protection and respiratory capacity necessary time to rise, a boat inflatable rescue and survival equipment which various operable surface.
Exercise training has been shown to improve respiratory capacity, airway resistance, exercise tolerance, and work of breathing.
Taking this into consideration, we can only assume that it is the movement of mucus that improves the respiratory capacity of our patients.