vital capacity

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vital capacity

n.
The amount of air that can be forcibly expelled from the lungs after breathing in as deeply as possible.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

vital capacity

n
(Physiology) physiol the volume of air that can be exhaled from the lungs after the deepest possible breath has been taken: a measure of lung function
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

vi′tal capac′ity



n.
the greatest amount of air that can be forced from the lungs after maximum inhalation.
[1850–55]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

vital capacity

The amount of air expelled from the lungs after taking a deep breath.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.vital capacity - the maximum amount of air that can be exhaled after a maximum inhalation (usually tested with a spirometer); used to determine the condition of lung tissue
diagnostic assay, diagnostic test - an assay conducted for diagnostic purposes
capacity, content - the amount that can be contained; "the gas tank has a capacity of 12 gallons"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
increased spare respiratory capacity) and by impacting cell differentiation.
"One might suspect that losing one of two lungs would cut respiratory capacity in half, but it doesn't because the human body has significant reserves." Someone who has a lung surgically removed retains between 70 to 80 percent of their respiratory function: "The surviving lung soon expands to compensate for its missing mate, and regular exercise speeds the process." Strenuous activity might be more difficult, but ordinary exercise is not affected if one of these breathing organs is removed.
In vivo analysis of mitochondrial respiratory capacity, among other parameters of cellular energetics, is certainly the most physiologically relevant approach to mitochondrial studies.
Low respiratory capacity can also be indicating to lowered metabolic activity in normal ductal/lobular tissue in older women (average age of HBC patients in this study was 63.4 years).
Besides baseline oxidative phosphorylation, spare respiratory capacity (SRC) represents the mitochondrial phosphorylation reserve, available to cope with an extra metabolic demand.
On one hand, the respiratory capacity and the cellular ATP levels are reduced, both key tasks of the mitochondrion, the powerhouse of the cell At the same time, all cells without HSP60 presented changes.
Indeed, VOCs exposure may affect health (irritations, reduced respiratory capacity, olfactory pollution; some VOCs are also considered to be carcinogens) and the environment (an early factor in ozone formation, greenhouse gases, and the formation of secondary particles).
Babies with type I SMA are at very high risk of irreversible decline in respiratory capacity. Type I SMA carries a high mortality rate, with more than half of all affected children not surviving beyond two years of age.
Exercise training has been shown to improve respiratory capacity, airway resistance, exercise tolerance, and work of breathing.21 The study gives a clue to improvement in muscle strength, endurance, maintaining of positive pressure in the airways and improving the efficiency of ventilation with regular exercise.
Taking this into consideration, we can only assume that it is the movement of mucus that improves the respiratory capacity of our patients.
It can increase the systolic and diastolic blood pressures, resulting in reduced maximum respiratory capacity among smokers (N.