References in classic literature ?
Joe was too busy living through the storm he had already caused, blocking, covering up, and ducking into the safety and respite of the clinches.
He evidently wanted a little respite. After turning his head from right to left for some time, he sighed and looked down.
Yes, I am again in control of myself: "the captain of my soul." But that is not respite; it is another stage and phase of expiation.
Six years more of toil they had to face before they could expect the least respite, the cessation of the payments upon the house; and how cruelly certain it was that they could never stand six years of such a life as they were living!
It was his brightness indeed that gave me a respite. Would it be so great if he were really going to tell me?
The very anticipations of delight to be enjoyed in his forthcoming visits -- the bright, pure gleam of heavenly happiness it diffused over the almost deadly warfare in which he had voluntarily engaged, illumined his whole countenance with a look of ineffable joy and calmness, as, immediately after Villefort's departure, his thoughts flew back to the cheering prospect before him, of tasting, at least, a brief respite from the fierce and stormy passions of his mind.
THE ragged line had respite for some min- utes, but during its pause the struggle in the forest became magnified until the trees seemed to quiver from the firing and the ground to shake from the rushing of the men.
Whilst burning-hot napkins, physic, revulsives, and Guenaud, who was recalled, were performing their functions with increased activity, Colbert, holding his great head in both his hands, to compress within it the fever of the projects engendered by the brain, was meditating the tenor of the donation he would make Mazarin write, at the first hour of respite his disease should afford him.
On the contrary, this morning you offered me a week's respite."
The sensations of bodily sickness, in a comfortable bed, and with the tendance of the good-natured landlady, made a sort of respite for her; such a respite as there is in the faint weariness which obliges a man to throw himself on the sand instead of toiling onward under the scorching sun.
"One obtains a respite; that does no harm to any one, and allows the midwives, who are poor women, to earn forty deniers parisis."
All were winded, but when those who were left of the eleven original antagonists drew back to regain their breath, the young giant gave them no respite, but leaped among them with the long lash they had such good reason to hate and fear.