resprout

resprout

(riːˈspraʊt)
vb
(Anatomy) to sprout again
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These plants can survive forest fires and resprout after fire or have seeds which survive fire.
Furthermore, plants with reduced carbon reserves in late summer/early fall may be less likely to resprout (Cruz et al, 2003; Pratt et al, 2014), negatively affecting production of the last generation of monarchs.
Do it in summer when they are least likely to resprout.
Well, that next summer we found that most of the damaged seedlings did resprout, only now the sprouts were short enough that deer could easily browse the succulent foliage.
Reproductive traits that could contribute to blue gum's ability to spread include yearly seed production (in many areas), seed production for more than 3 months per year (November to April, in California) and a tendency to resprout prolifically after damage (e.g., cutting, fire) (Rejmánek and Richardson 2011).
It is clear from Table 2 that a globally-convergent feature of SDTFs is the prevalence of the ability to resprout, which is key to recovery from a variety of disturbances including fire, drought, logging, storms, invasion, herbivory, and landslides.
Fortunately, you can cut these conifers off at the base and they seldom resprout. We also have produced nice summer thermal cover areas exactly where we want them by using a tree digger and relocating trees.
Data on basal trunk diameters, numbers of resprouts, and maximum resprout diameters met assumptions for parametric statistical analyses (Zar, 2010).
Live shrub and black oak resprout cover increased over time in the burn grids.
Shear or cut off faded flower spikes, but don't cut to bare wood as new growth might not resprout. Hellebores Perennial Plant hellebores for distinctive flowers in winter and spring.
When chopped up and left for dead, they resprout' (p.