restrainable


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re·strain

 (rĭ-strān′)
tr.v. re·strained, re·strain·ing, re·strains
1.
a. To hold back or keep in check; control: was able restrain his emotions.
b. To prevent (a person or group) from doing something or acting in a certain way: She was restrained from selling the house by her fond memories.
2. To hold, fasten, or secure so as to prevent or limit movement: hair restrained by a bandana; a child restrained by a seat belt.

[Middle English restreinen, from Old French restraindre, restreign-, from Latin restringere, to bind back; see restrict.]

re·strain′a·ble adj.
re·strain′ed·ly (-strā′nĭd-lē) adv.
re·strain′er n.
Synonyms: restrain, curb, check, bridle, inhibit
These verbs mean to hold back or keep under control. Restrain implies restriction or limitation, as on one's freedom of action: "a wise and frugal government, which shall restrain men from injuring one another" (Thomas Jefferson).
To curb is to restrain as if with reins: "As a teacher he was rather dull. He curbed his own enthusiasms, finding that they distracted his attention" (E.M. Forster).
Check implies arresting or stopping, often suddenly: "Knowing that Lily disliked to be caressed, she had long ago learned to check her demonstrative impulses toward her friend" (Edith Wharton).
To bridle is often to hold in or govern one's emotions or passions: I tried hard to bridle my anger. Inhibit usually connotes a check on one's actions, thoughts, or emotions: A fear of strangers inhibited his ability to travel.
References in periodicals archive ?
We hear that the progeny of this marriage were a "pleasant and kindly race of men, but capable of savage fierceness and never quite restrainable within the trammels of social law" (4:233).
Donor dogs should be 25 kg or more, aged between 1-8 years and should be calm and easily restrainable and able to stay still for about ten minutes.
Open Door Counselling, the High Court found counseling and assisting pregnant women to travel abroad to obtain an abortion illegal under Article 40.3.3 of the Irish Constitution and such activity was restrainable. (104) The Court rejected the defendants' arguments that the constitutional right to privacy, right to freedom of expression and communication, and right to freedom of access to information protected their activities.