restrictionism


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re·stric·tion·ism

 (rĭ-strĭk′shə-nĭz′əm)
n.
A viewpoint or policy approving the imposing of restrictions, as on immigration or trade.

re·stric′tion·ist n.

restrictionism

(rɪˈstrɪkʃənˌɪzəm)
n
1. (Philosophy) a view, philosophy, or policy in favour of the imposition of restrictions
2. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) a view, philosophy, or policy in favour of the imposition of restrictions

restrictionism

the philosophy that advocates restriction and restraint, as in trade dealings. — restrictionist, n., adj.
See also: Philosophy
References in periodicals archive ?
In practice, that means tariffs (page 74), immigration restrictionism (page 51), and massive infusions of public money (often with government directives attached) intended to reorganize and resuscitate the American industrial sector.
Most provocatively, Kaufmann argues that the best way to marginalize white racism is to find some accomodation with white fear of too-fast demographic change, especially via moderate immigration restrictionism. This is not an entirely new argument: Carol Swain, then at Vanderbilt University, made a similar recommendation in her 2002 book The New White Nationalism in America.
In Defence of Radical Restrictionism, DAVID LIGGINS
Carlson is similarly more in tune than anyone else with the mix of populism, economic centrism, immigration restrictionism, and war fatigue that motivates today's disaffected Right.
If anything, restrictionism would hurt the economy.
So if you care about liberalism more deeply than you care about immigration restrictions, you should give up on restrictionism. You cannot hold on to both.
Nicholas DiMarzio of Brooklyn, New York, called for the bishops to reach out to members of Congress regarding two immigration bills set for a vote in the House of Representatives, noting one from the Freedom Caucus included "an element of restrictionism, somewhat based on racism."
It should be noted that Trump received significant support from paleoconservatives, such as Presser, not because Trump represents a traditional mode of life (he most certainly does not, as a flamboyant, secular, thrice-married, real-estate mogul), but because he supports the three policy platforms that paleoconservatives tend to care about most: (1) military isolationism, (2) trade protectionism, and (3) immigration restrictionism. See supra note 12.
For example, the electrical equipment cartel of the 1950s and 1960s developed a social norm of members concealing their price fixing, (147) and the magnesium cartel "cultivated] a philosophy of restrictionism." (148) Ultimately, these social norms can convince cartel participants that price fixing is perfectly acceptable.
2015) ("[T]he 1996 federal welfare and immigration laws introduced an unprecedented new era of restrictionism.").
opposed these laws more because they possessed the taint of discrimination and anti-Semitism than because they would drastically limit Jewish immigration many there was nothing really inconsistent about attacking the quota laws for their racism and hoping for immigration restrictionism. Both attitudes reflected the same purpose of combatting the impression of the Jew as an alien, unassimilable figure.
"We are supposed to believe that Trumpist economic nationalism - as shaped by Bannon - embraces a heterodox combination of hard-line immigration restrictionism and pro-worker trade policies and a decisive ideological break with Ryanism when it comes to spending and social insurance for the elderly.