restrictionist


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Financial, Encyclopedia.

re·stric·tion·ism

 (rĭ-strĭk′shə-nĭz′əm)
n.
A viewpoint or policy approving the imposing of restrictions, as on immigration or trade.

re·stric′tion·ist n.

restrictionist

(rɪˈstrɪkʃənˌɪst)
n
1. (Philosophy) someone who believes in restrictionism
2. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) someone who believes in restrictionism
adj
3. (Philosophy) of or relating to restrictionism
4. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) of or relating to restrictionism
References in periodicals archive ?
restrictionist is forced to argue that, as an empirical matter,
Likewise, Science at the Borders does not address the relationship between the politics of immigration affairs, as fought by liberalizer and restrictionist politicians and organizations on the national level, and the regional variations of the immigrants' inspection and admissions process.
Glaap's "Views on the Holocaust in Contemporary Canadian Plays" reviews both Canadian political history and reflection there upon in Canadian theatre with reference to Canada's racist and anti-Semitic restrictionist immigration policies that saw only 5,000 Jewish refugees admitted to Canada during the twelve-year Nazi Regime.
(5) In response some press commentators have concluded that public sentiment has already shifted towards a more restrictionist position.
In this election year, however, scores of Republican Congress members, ensconced in safe, conservative, mostly white districts, find no allure in appealing to Latinos, and a restrictionist view on immigration prevails within the Republican caucus.
In the past decade, however, the encounter at sea between the asylum seekers and repelling state has become a hallmark of the desperation on both sides in the prevailing restrictionist climate.
Beattie spoke on the same panel as Peter Brimelow, an immigration restrictionist writer with deep ties to the American elite from his days as a financial journalist.
But he says he won't engage in what his restrictionist pals deride as "catch and release."
He's actually more restrictionist than Trump where guest worker visas are concerned and opposed the administration's plan this year to allow 30,000 more of them.
Immigration, especially the restrictionist version of it that the white nationalists in the Trump administration wish to implement, is unlikely to pass as legislation, and so why not use the rule changes?
They also focus on higher-income NYC neighborhoods, which tend to be more politically powerful and more restrictionist in terms of development.
Will he permanently push the United States back to the restrictionist view of trade that promotes protection of domestic industries?