restriction

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re·stric·tion

 (rĭ-strĭk′shən)
n.
1. The action of restricting or the state of being restricted: the country's restriction of immigration.
2. Something that restricts; a regulation or limitation: a restriction banning dogs from the beach.

restriction

(rɪˈstrɪkʃən)
n
1. something that restricts; a restrictive measure, law, etc
2. the act of restricting or the state of being restricted
3. (Logic) logic maths a condition that imposes a constraint on the possible values of a variable or on the domain of arguments of a function
4. (Mathematics) logic maths a condition that imposes a constraint on the possible values of a variable or on the domain of arguments of a function

re•stric•tion

(rɪˈstrɪk ʃən)

n.
1. something that restricts.
2. the act of restricting.
3. the state of being restricted.
[1375–1425; < Late Latin restrictiō < Latin restric-, variant s. of restringere (see restrict)]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.restriction - a principle that limits the extent of somethingrestriction - a principle that limits the extent of something; "I am willing to accept certain restrictions on my movements"
rule, regulation - a principle or condition that customarily governs behavior; "it was his rule to take a walk before breakfast"; "short haircuts were the regulation"
narrowness - a restriction of range or scope; "the problem with achievement tests is the narrowness they impose on students"; "the attraction of the book is precisely its narrowness of focus"; "frustrated by the narrowness of people's horizons"
quantification - a limitation imposed on the variables of a proposition (as by the quantifiers `some' or `all' or `no')
restraint - a rule or condition that limits freedom; "legal restraints"; "restraints imposed on imports"
2.restriction - an act of limiting or restricting (as by regulation)
regulating, regulation - the act of controlling or directing according to rule; "fiscal regulations are in the hands of politicians"
load-shedding - cutting off the electric current on certain lines when the demand becomes greater than the supply
arms control - a limitation on the size and armament of the armed forces of a country
hold-down - a limitation or constraint; "taxpayers want a hold-down on government spending"
freeze - fixing (of prices or wages etc) at a particular level; "a freeze on hiring"
clampdown - sudden restriction on an activity
3.restriction - the act of keeping something within specified bounds (by force if necessary); "the restriction of the infection to a focal area"
restraint - the act of controlling by restraining someone or something; "the unlawful restraint of trade"
classification - restriction imposed by the government on documents or weapons that are available only to certain authorized people
stipulation, specification - a restriction that is insisted upon as a condition for an agreement
circumscription - the act of circumscribing
constraint - the act of constraining; the threat or use of force to control the thoughts or behavior of others

restriction

noun
2. limitation, limit, handicap, constraint, inhibition the restrictions of urban living

restriction

noun
1. The act of limiting or condition of being limited:
Translations
تَقييد، تَحْديدقَيْد، حَد
omezeníomezovánízákaz
begrænsning
takmörkuntakmörkun; hömlur
omejitev
kısıtlamasınırlama

restriction

[rɪsˈtrɪkʃən] Nrestricción f, limitación f
without restriction as tosin restricción de ...
to place restrictions on the sale of a drugponer limitaciones a la venta de una droga
to place restrictions on sb's libertyrestringir la libertad de algn

restriction

[rɪˈstrɪkʃən] n
(= limitation) [imports, sales, travel, amount, numbers, investment, growth] → restriction f
travel restrictions → restrictions de voyage
restrictions on sth
restrictions on growth → restrictions à la croissance
the lifting of restrictions on growth → la levée des restrictions à la croissance
restrictions on imports → restrictions sur les importations
the imposition of restrictions on weapons sales → l'imposition de restrictions sur les ventes d'armes
The government placed restrictions on sales of weapons → Le gouvernement a imposé des restrictions à la vente d'armes.
the lifting of restrictions on freedom of expression → la levée des restrictions de la liberté d'expression
(= limiting, confining) [freedom, movement] → restriction f

restriction

n (→ etw gen) → Beschränkung f; (of freedom, authority also)Einschränkung f; (on time, number also) → Begrenzung f; to place restrictions on somethingetw beschränken or einschränken; restrictions of spaceräumliche Beschränktheit; without restrictionsuneingeschränkt; speed restriction (Mot) → Geschwindigkeitsbegrenzung for -beschränkung f; price restrictionPreisbeschränkung f

restriction

[rɪˈstrɪkʃn] nlimitazione f, restrizione f
to place restrictions on sth → imporre delle restrizioni su qc
speed restriction (Aut) → limite m di velocità

restrict

(rəˈstrikt) verb
1. to keep within certain limits. I try to restrict myself / my smoking to five cigarettes a day; Use of the car-park is restricted to senior staff.
2. to make less than usual, desirable etc. He feels this new law will restrict his freedom.
reˈstricted adjective
1. limited; narrow, small. a restricted space.
2. to which entry has been restricted to certain people. The battlefield was a restricted zone.
3. in which certain restrictions (eg a speed limit) apply. a restricted area.
reˈstriction (-ʃən) noun
1. a rule etc that limits or controls. Even in a free democracy a person's behaviour must be subject to certain restrictions.
2. the act of restricting. restriction of freedom.
reˈstrictive (-tiv) adjective
restricting or intended to restrict.

restriction

n restricción f, limitación f; intrauterine growth — restricción del crecimiento intrauterino, crecimiento intrauterino retardado; (medical) work — restricción de trabajo (por indicaciones médicas)
References in periodicals archive ?
When thinking about immigration, restrictionists tend to worry that low-skilled immigrants will drag down US wages, despite plenty of evidence that this effect is small or nonexistent.
Restrictionists will cite the approximately 33,000 annual gun deaths in America, but that number reveals almost nothing about the question the public really wants answered after Vegas or the Orlando nightclub shooting before it: How likely am I to die in an incident of random violence?
Immigration restrictionists use Borjas's results, which rely on the national skill-cell method, to justify further diminishing legal immigration.
While much of the onus for action against sanctuary cities remains on the Trump administration, which is embattled on multiple fronts, immigration restrictionists expect the executive branch to rise to the occasion.
In 1929, as restrictionists and employers tussled over the future of Mexican immigration, Blease proposed a way forward.
In the shorthand of conservative immigration restrictionists, Rubio was against "amnesty" before he sponsored a Senate bill providing a path to citizenship for 11 million undocumented immigrants in the US.
Garland briefly traces the legislative battle to change immigration law as Mexicans replaced Europeans as the target for restrictionists by the 1950s and 1960s, but it lacks the passion of earlier chapters.
Chapter 2 explores the series of legal cases initiated by restrictionists in their drive to have Mexican immigrants ruled ineligible for citizenship.
In that era, immigration restrictionists complained about gypsies and the Chinese.
conservative legal thinkers, restrictionists have obtained popular
Restrictionists in that retelling get lumped together with "nativists" and Know Nothings motivated by nothing more than bigotry against people who are "not like us.