restuff

restuff

(ˌriːˈstʌf)
vb (tr)
1. to put new material into (cushions, furniture, toys, etc) in order to make firm or solid
2. (Cookery) to put a new mixture of food inside (a chicken, pepper, etc) before cooking
References in periodicals archive ?
In 2012 the Foreign Office paid PS10,000 to restuff a 20ft anaconda called Albert.
If they can't help, a local upholsterer can restuff your cushions for a couple of hundred pounds.
Today, the shame-tagged PIIGS (Portugal, Ireland, Italy and Greece) have had their democratically elected leaders supplanted by austerity technocrats, and have mined their infrastructure to, in the case of Greece, pay off loans originally oversold to them by mercenary US banks, or more typically, to restuff their undisciplined and imploding national private banks.
But the furniture giant would only restuff the cushions with foam instead of the existing rag-type fibre if the couple paid pounds 120.
If a container was found in violation of the rule, the ILA could unpack it, restuff it and fine the company $1,000--in addition to slowing down the delivery, thus raising the transportation cost considerably.
Frank Baum's Scarecrow lost some of his straw along the yellow brick road, it was easy enough for Dorothy to restuff him and continue on to Oz.