resurgence

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re·sur·gence

 (rĭ-sûr′jəns)
n.
1. A continuing after interruption; a renewal.
2. A restoration to use, acceptance, activity, or vigor; a revival.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.resurgence - bringing again into activity and prominence; "the revival of trade"; "a revival of a neglected play by Moliere"; "the Gothic revival in architecture"
Renaissance, Renascence, rebirth - the revival of learning and culture
regeneration - the activity of spiritual or physical renewal
resurrection - a revival from inactivity and disuse; "it produced a resurrection of hope"
resuscitation - the act of reviving a person and returning them to consciousness; "although he was apparently drowned, resuscitation was accomplished by artificial respiration"
betterment, improvement, advance - a change for the better; progress in development

resurgence

resurgence

noun
1. A continuing after interruption:
2. The act of reviving or condition of being revived:
Translations

resurgence

[rɪˈsɜːdʒəns] Nresurgimiento m

resurgence

[rɪˈsɜːrəns] n [interest] → regain m; [violence, racism, nationalism] → regain m; [currency, market, economy] → reprise f; [party, team] → renaissance f

resurgence

resurgence

[rɪˈsɜːdʒəns] n (frm) → rinascita
References in classic literature ?
They were painful at first, but their constant resurgence at last altogether upset my balance.
The study, which linked overall weakened malaria control programs to the majority of global resurgences since 1930, analysed the causes of 75 documented episodes of malaria resurgence throughout the world over the past 80 years, both in countries that were close to eliminating the disease and those with higher transmission rates that were attempting to control it.
During a major outbreak, traditional surges of activity are based on one threat, such as a worm or virus; however, the week leading up to the Easter holiday saw a different pattern, coming from two directions: 45% were large resurgences of old malware (e.