resurrection plant

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resurrection plant

American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

resurrection plant

n
(Plants) any of several unrelated desert plants that form a tight ball when dry and unfold and bloom when moistened. The best-known examples are the crucifer Anastatica hierochuntica (also called rose of Jericho), club mosses of the genus Selaginella, and the composite Asteriscus pygmoeus
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.resurrection plant - densely tufted fern ally of southwestern United States to Peruresurrection plant - densely tufted fern ally of southwestern United States to Peru; curls up in a tight ball when dry and expands and grows under moist conditions
little club moss, spike moss, spikemoss - any of numerous fern allies of the genus Selaginella
2.resurrection plant - small grey Asiatic desert plant bearing minute white flowers that rolls up when dry and expands when moistresurrection plant - small grey Asiatic desert plant bearing minute white flowers that rolls up when dry and expands when moist
crucifer, cruciferous plant - any of various plants of the family Cruciferae
Anastatica, genus Anastatica - one species: rose of Jericho; resurrection plant
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
In resurrection plants, for example, the cellular wall bending and the cells contraction allow the reversibility of withering and curling of the leaves (Moore et al., 2006; Moore et al., 2008).
A role for expansins in dehydration and rehydration of the resurrection plant Craterostigma plantagineum.
The water content of the foliage of resurrection plants corresponds to variations in the relative humidity (RH) of the local environment (Gaff, "Desiccation-Tolerant" 1033-34).
The international cast of academics describes angiosperm resurrection plants, lichens, gene expression, dry seeds and pollen, DNA structure, and desiccation damage in plant reproductive organs.
The hot, dry conditions of South Africa have forced the evolution of so-called resurrection plants. After a year or more without water, these desiccated plants appear dead.
What is meant by resurrection plants? How do plants and animals make the most of every drop of water?