resynthesis


Also found in: Medical.

resynthesis

(ˌriːˈsɪnθəsɪs)
n
the act, state or process of being resynthesized
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
On the other hand, the DRG soma, when compared to the axonal segment of the SN, for example, has a larger capability to respond to the metabolic insult through a constant resynthesis of proteins.
Maximal voluntary contraction force, SR function and glycogen resynthesis during the first 72 h after a high-level competitive soccer game.
These characteristics require athletes to have good aerobic fitness (Lima, Silva and Souza, 2005; Menezes and Lopes, 2015) so that in the moments of low intensity during the match, the resynthesis of energy stocks is done more quickly and efficiently, as well as the removal and use of lactate, allowing better performance (Fachineto, Erlo and Martins 2017).
Effect of oral creatine supplementation on skeletal muscle phosphocreatine resynthesis. Am J Physiol.
This may be due to a greater recruitment of the type muscle II fibers, greater use of the creatine phosphate system, and insufficient time for resynthesis of PCr.
(1994) Effect of oral creatine supplementation on skeletal muscle phosphocreatine resynthesis. American Journal of Physiology 266, E725-730.
This family of receptors responds to ligand activation by receptor internalization (to the cytosol), degradation, resynthesis, and recycling to the cell surface [24].
Fluid and electrolyte supplementation after prolonged moderate-intensity exercise enhances muscle glycogen resynthesis in Standardbred horses.
it uses a computer controlled laser light source) except that it also has infinite depth of focus and causes the eye itself to, in effect, function as both a camera and a display, by way of exact alignment with the eye and resynthesis (in laser light) of rays of light entering the eye.
A World in Emergence: Notes Towards a Resynthesis of Urban-Economic Geography for the 21st Century.
Rehydration after exercise has three major purposes: to replace fluid volume to an equal or greater extent than the volume lost while sweating, to ingest liquid and/or solid carbohydrates to aid in glycogen resynthesis (Sherman, 1992) and to replace electrolytes lost during sweating.