reticence


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ret·i·cent

 (rĕt′ĭ-sənt)
adj.
1. Inclined to keep one's thoughts, feelings, and personal affairs to oneself. See Synonyms at laconic.
2. Restrained or reserved: "The laughter was steady, if reticent" (Bernard Lown).
3. Usage Problem Reluctant; unwilling.

[Latin reticēns, reticent-, present participle of reticēre, to keep silent : re-, re- + tacēre, to be silent.]

ret′i·cence (-səns) adv.
ret′i·cent·ly adv.
Usage Note: Reticent is generally used to indicate a reluctance to speak. Most commentators on usage have criticized its extended use as an all-purpose synonym for reluctant. In our 2001 survey, 83 percent of the Panel found unacceptable the sentence A lot of out-of-towners are reticent to come to the Twin Cities for a ballgame if there's a chance the game will be rained out.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.reticence - the trait of being uncommunicative; not volunteering anything more than necessary
uncommunicativeness - the trait of being uncommunicative

reticence

noun silence, reserve, restraint, quietness, secretiveness, taciturnity, uncommunicativeness, unforthcomingness She didn't mind his reticence.

reticence

noun
1. The keeping of one's thoughts and emotions to oneself:
2. Reserve in speech, behavior, or dress:
Translations

reticence

[ˈretɪsəns] Nreticencia f, reserva f

reticence

[ˈretɪsəns] nréticence f

reticence

reticence

[ˈrɛtɪsns] nreticenza
References in classic literature ?
Yet it was right here, in his reticence, that the strength of his wooing lay.
Already had I developed reticence concerning this quality of mine, this semi-disassociation of personality as I think I am justified in calling it.
And, as John Barleycorn heated his way into my brain, thawing my reticence, melting my modesty, talking through me and with me and as me, my adopted twin brother and alter ego, I, too, raised my voice to show myself a man and an adventurer, and bragged in detail and at length of how I had crossed San Francisco Bay in my open skiff in a roaring southwester when even the schooner sailors doubted my exploit.
Grose finally got up she kept the child's hand, so that the two were still before me; and the singular reticence of our communion was even more marked in the frank look she launched me.
It was such a relief to Clare to learn that Tess was at least apparently well that her mother's stiff reticence as to her whereabouts did not long distress him.
My reticence was rebuked in the papers that made the most of me, but would fain have made more.
His decent reticence is branded as hypocrisy, his circumlocutions are roundly called lies, and his silence is vilified as treachery.
And in the points of suspense which he placed after this reticence in his mind, there lay I know not what flattering ideas.
He was a great little creature, and through his intense personality he achieved a sort of impersonality, so that you loved the man, who was forever talking-of himself, for his modesty and reticence. He left you feeling intimate with him but by no means familiar; with all his frailties, and with all those freedoms he permitted himself with the lives of his contemporaries, he is to me a figure of delicate dignity, and winning kindness.
"There is no need to shelter yourself under professional reticence. Your connection with Scotland Yard ended, I believe, some time ago.
Followed as he followed it, with a skilful reticence, in a kind of social chiaroscuro, it was still possible for the polite to call him a professional painter.
Perhaps they thought that our means were too modest for them, and, therefore, unworthy of politeness or reticence. Also, for the last three days I had noticed certain looks which Astley had kept throwing at Mlle.