reticent


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ret·i·cent

 (rĕt′ĭ-sənt)
adj.
1. Inclined to keep one's thoughts, feelings, and personal affairs to oneself. See Synonyms at laconic.
2. Restrained or reserved: "The laughter was steady, if reticent" (Bernard Lown).
3. Usage Problem Reluctant; unwilling.

[Latin reticēns, reticent-, present participle of reticēre, to keep silent : re-, re- + tacēre, to be silent.]

ret′i·cence (-səns) adv.
ret′i·cent·ly adv.
Usage Note: Reticent is generally used to indicate a reluctance to speak. Most commentators on usage have criticized its extended use as an all-purpose synonym for reluctant. In our 2001 survey, 83 percent of the Panel found unacceptable the sentence A lot of out-of-towners are reticent to come to the Twin Cities for a ballgame if there's a chance the game will be rained out.

reticent

(ˈrɛtɪsənt)
adj
not open or communicative; not saying all that one knows; taciturn; reserved
[C19: from Latin reticēre to keep silent, from re- + tacēre to be silent]
ˈreticence n
ˈreticently adv

ret•i•cent

(ˈrɛt ə sənt)

adj.
1. disposed to be silent or not to speak freely; reserved.
2. restrained, as in style or appearance.
[1825–35; < Latin reticent-, s. of reticēns, present participle of reticēre to keep silent =re- re- + -ticēre, comb. form of tacēre to be silent; see -ent]
ret′i•cence, ret′i•cen•cy, n.
ret′i•cent•ly, adv.

reticent

- Based on Latin tacere, "be silent," combined with re-, an intensive prefix.
See also related terms for silent.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.reticent - temperamentally disinclined to talkreticent - temperamentally disinclined to talk
taciturn - habitually reserved and uncommunicative
2.reticent - cool and formal in mannerreticent - cool and formal in manner    
undemonstrative - not given to open expression of emotion
3.reticent - reluctant to draw attention to yourself
unassertive - inclined to timidity or lack of self-confidence; "a shy unassertive person"

reticent

reticent

adjective
Translations

reticent

[ˈretɪsənt] ADJreticente, reservado
he has been very reticent about itha tratado el asunto con la mayor reserva

reticent

[ˈrɛtɪsənt] adjréticent(e)
reticent about sth → réticent(e) à parler de qch

reticent

adjzurückhaltend; to be reticent about somethingin Bezug auf etw (acc)nicht sehr gesprächig sein

reticent

[ˈrɛtɪsnt] adjreticente, riservato/a
References in classic literature ?
I found Montgomery very reticent about his purpose with these creatures, and about his destination; and though I was sensible of a growing curiosity as to both, I did not press him.
It was a matter upon which he was reticent, and with persons of his kind a direct question is never very discreet.
She was, it is needless to say, perfectly well aware that he was in love with her, while he was himself modestly reticent on the subject-- so far as words went.
But, in short, it is very manifest that he had one alone whom he made mistress of his will, to whom he commended himself very frequently and very secretly, for he prided himself on being a reticent knight.
She was quick at understanding the grandmothers who spoke no English, and the most reticent and distrustful of them would tell her their story without realizing they were doing so.
She had told him she was not now at Marlott, but had been curiously reticent as to her actual address, and the only course was to go to Marlott and inquire for it.
She had no sense of chill resolute repulsion, of reticent self-justification such as she had known under Lydgate's most stormy displeasure: all her sensibility was turned into a bewildering novelty of pain; she felt a new terrified recoil under a lash never experienced before.
In many ways my mother was as reticent as myself, though her manners were as gracious as mine were rough (in vain, alas
The affections are more reticent than the passions, and their expression more subtle.
He was forty years old, and by his nature very silent and reticent.
He immediately began to talk to Drummle: not at all deterred by his replying in his heavy reticent way, but apparently led on by it to screw discourse out of him.
Upon the point of their purpose in visiting the place Condon found the boy reticent, and so he did not push the matter--he had learned all that he cared to know as it was.