reticule

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reticule

ret·i·cule

 (rĕt′ĭ-kyo͞ol′)
n.
1. A drawstring handbag or purse.
2. A reticle.

[French réticule, from Latin rēticulum, diminutive of rēte, net.]

reticule

(ˈrɛtɪˌkjuːl)
n
1. (Clothing & Fashion) (in the 18th and 19th centuries) a woman's small bag or purse, usually in the form of a pouch with a drawstring and made of net, beading, brocade, etc
2. (General Physics) a variant of reticle
[C18: from French réticule, from Latin rēticulum reticle]

ret•i•cule

(ˈrɛt ɪˌkyul)

n.
1. a small purse or bag, orig. of network but later of fabric.
[1720–30; < French réticule < Latin rēticulum reticle]

reticule

- An older term for a small handbag, it alludes to the fact that they were originally made of netted fabric—Latin rete, "net," became reticulum, "netted bag."
See also related terms for net.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.reticule - a woman's drawstring handbag; usually made of net or beading or brocade; used in 18th and 19th centuries
handbag, purse, bag, pocketbook - a container used for carrying money and small personal items or accessories (especially by women); "she reached into her bag and found a comb"
2.reticule - a network of fine lines, dots, cross hairs, or wires in the focal plane of the eyepiece of an optical instrument
cross hair, cross wire - either of two fine mutually perpendicular lines that cross in the focus plane of an optical instrument and are use for sighting or calibration; "he had the target in his cross hairs"
eyepiece, ocular - combination of lenses at the viewing end of optical instruments
network - a system of intersecting lines or channels; "a railroad network"; "a network of canals"
Translations

reticule

[ˈretɪkjuːl] N
1. (Opt) → retículo m
2. (Hist) (= bag) → ridículo m
References in classic literature ?
All this time sobbing, and searching in the little reticule.
Spenlow, what you have in your reticule, Miss Murdstone.
Yesterday a black satin reticule was lost in the Grands Magasins de la Louvre.
The purse was emptied, and the reticule rummaged, the whole amounting to just twenty-eight francs seven sous.
That is true, Mademoiselle de Montmorenci," said Lydgate, just bending his head to the table and lifting with his fourth finger her delicate handkerchief which lay at the mouth of her reticule, as if to enjoy its scent, while he looked at her with a smile.
I made up my mind that I would carry along a reticule next time, let it look how it might, and people say what they would.
We got an old tin lantern, and a butcher-knife with- out any handle, and a bran-new Barlow knife worth two bits in any store, and a lot of tallow candles, and a tin candlestick, and a gourd, and a tin cup, and a ratty old bedquilt off the bed, and a reticule with needles and pins and beeswax and buttons and thread and all such truck in it, and a hatchet and some nails, and a fishline as thick as my little finger with some mon- strous hooks on it, and a roll of buckskin, and a leather dog-collar, and a horseshoe, and some vials of medicine that didn't have no label on them; and just as we was leaving I found a tolerable good curry-comb, and Jim he found a ratty old fiddle-bow, and a wooden leg.
Perhaps, my dear, Mr Noggs would like to drink our healths,' said Mrs Nickleby, fumbling in her reticule for some small coin.
In the centre of this enchanted garden Madame Nilsson, in white cashmere slashed with pale blue satin, a reticule dangling from a blue girdle, and large yellow braids carefully disposed on each side of her muslin chemisette, listened with downcast eyes to M.
She carries some small litter in a reticule which she calls her documents, principally consisting of paper matches and dry lavender.
She took a pair of pear-shaped ruby earrings from her huge reticule and, having given them to the rosy Natasha, who beamed with the pleasure of her saint's-day fete, turned away at once and addressed herself to Pierre.
s Aunt already stumbling over some impediment, and menacing steam power as an Institution with a stony reticule she carried.