retina


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Related to retina: Retina Display

ret·i·na

 (rĕt′n-ə)
n. pl. ret·i·nas or ret·i·nae (rĕt′n-ē′)
A delicate, multilayered, light-sensitive membrane lining the inner eyeball and connected by the optic nerve to the brain.

[Middle English, from Medieval Latin rētina, from Latin rēte, net.]

ret′i·nal adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

retina

(ˈrɛtɪnə)
n, pl -nas or -nae (-ˌniː)
(Anatomy) the light-sensitive membrane forming the inner lining of the posterior wall of the eyeball, composed largely of a specialized terminal expansion of the optic nerve. Images focused here by the lens of the eye are transmitted to the brain as nerve impulses
[C14: from Medieval Latin, perhaps from Latin rēte net]
ˈretinal adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

ret•i•na

(ˈrɛt n ə, ˈrɛt nə)

n., pl. ret•i•nas, ret•i•nae (ˈrɛt nˌi)
the innermost coat of the posterior part of the eyeball that receives the image produced by the lens, is continuous with the optic nerve, and consists of several layers, one of which contains the rods and cones that are sensitive to light.
[1350–1400; Middle English ret(h)ina < Medieval Latin rētina, perhaps = Latin rēt-, s. of rēte net + -ina -ine3]

Ret•in-A

(ˌrɛt nˈeɪ)
Trademark.
a brand of tretinoin, used esp. to reduce wrinkles caused by overexposure to the sun.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

ret·i·na

(rĕt′n-ə)
The light-sensitive membrane that lines the inside of the back of the eyeball, connected to the brain by the optic nerve. The retina of vertebrate animals contains specialized cells, called rods and cones, that absorb light.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

retina

- From Latin rete, "net," as there is a net of nerves making up this layer of the eyeball.
See also related terms for net.
Farlex Trivia Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

retina


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The back of the eyeball where neurons convert light into electrical impulses that pass through the brain. See cones, rods
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.retina - the innermost light-sensitive membrane covering the back wall of the eyeballretina - the innermost light-sensitive membrane covering the back wall of the eyeball; it is continuous with the optic nerve
neuroepithelium - epithelium associated with special sense organs and containing sensory nerve endings
eye, oculus, optic - the organ of sight
tissue layer, membrane - a pliable sheet of tissue that covers or lines or connects the organs or cells of animals or plants
fovea, fovea centralis - area consisting of a small depression in the retina containing cones and where vision is most acute
parafovea - area of the retina immediately surrounding the fovea
macula lutea, macular area, yellow spot, macula - a small yellowish central area of the retina that is rich in cones and that mediates clear detailed vision
visual cell - one of the cells of the retina that is sensitive to light
optic disc, optic disk, blind spot - the point where the optic nerve enters the retina; not sensitive to light
cone cell, retinal cone, cone - a visual receptor cell in the retina that is sensitive to bright light and to color
retinal rod, rod cell, rod - a visual receptor cell that is sensitive to dim light
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
شَبَكِيَّة العَيْن
sítnice
nethinderetina
NetzhautRetina
retina
sjónhimna
tinklainė
tīklene
sietnica
ağ tabakaretina

retina

[ˈretɪnə] N (retinas or retinae (pl)) [ˈretɪniː] (Anat) → retina f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

retina

[ˈrɛtɪnə] nrétine f
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

retina

n pl <-e or -s> → Netzhaut f, → Retina f (spec)
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

retina

[ˈrɛtɪnə] nretina
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

retina

(ˈretinə) noun
the part of the back of the eye that receives the image of what is seen.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.

ret·i·na

n. retina, la capa más interna del ojo que recibe imágenes y transmite impulsos visuales al cerebro;
detachment of the ___desprendimiento de la ___.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

retina

n (pl -nas o -nae) retina; detached — desprendimiento de retina
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in classic literature ?
"And isn't strange, said the young lady, passing with startling suddenness from Sentiment to Science, "that the mere impact of certain coloured rays upon the Retina should give us such exquisite pleasure?"
"It seems a paradox, does it not," he went on, "that the image formed on the Retina should be inverted?"
"The image of the Vespertilio was on the retina," the astounded enquirer into the secrets of nature observed, in a manner that seemed a little apologetic, "and I was silly enough to mistake my own faithful beast for the monster.
Mellowed in the drowsy sunlight of a summer's afternoon, Wargrave, nestling where the river bends, makes a sweet old picture as you pass it, and one that lingers long upon the retina of memory.
Peter's, the huge bronze canopy, the excited intention in the attitudes and garments of the prophets and evangelists in the mosaics above, and the red drapery which was being hung for Christmas spreading itself everywhere like a disease of the retina.
The flare was momentary, followed by black darkness, in which, however, the apparition still showed white and motionless; then by insensible degrees it faded and vanished, like a bright image on the retina after the closing of the eyes.
And last of all, that evident confusion in the sunshine, that hasty yet fumbling awkward flight towards dark shadow, and that peculiar carriage of the head while in the light--all reinforced the theory of an extreme sensitiveness of the retina.
Gradually the hearth, the dim library, the candle-light disappeared--seemed to melt away into a background of light, the green serpent with the diamond eyes remaining a dark image on the retina. Then I had a sense of my eyelids quivering, and the living daylight broke in upon me; I saw gardens, and heard voices; I was seated on the steps of the Belvedere Terrace, and my friends were round me.
As, in the sun, objects paint their images on the retina of the eye, so they, sharing the aspiration of the whole universe, tend to paint a far more delicate copy of their essence in his mind.
To look at a star by glances - to view it in a side-long way, by turning toward it the exterior portions of the retina (more susceptible of feeble impressions of light than the interior), is to behold the star distinctly - is to have the best appreciation of its lustre - a lustre which grows dim just in proportion as we turn our vision fully upon it.
[USPRwire, Tue Aug 20 2019] The Mobile Retina Services Market pertains to the eye care industry which includes preventive, diagnostic and curative services related to normal and healthy functioning of the eyes.