retinaculum

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ret·i·nac·u·lum

 (rĕt′n-ăk′yə-ləm)
n. pl. ret·i·nac·u·la (-lə) Biology
A band or bandlike structure that holds an organ or a part in place.

[Latin retināculum, band, tether : retinēre, to restrain; see retain + -culum, suff. denoting instruments.]

ret′i·nac′u·lar (-lər) adj.

retinaculum

(ˌrɛtɪˈnækjʊləm)
n, pl -la (-lə)
1. connection or retention or something that connects or retains
2. (Zoology) zoology a small hook that joins the forewing and hind wing of a moth during flight
[C18 (a surgical instrument used in castration): Latin, from rētinēre to hold back]
ˌretiˈnacular adj

ret•i•nac•u•lum

(ˌrɛt nˈæk yə ləm)

n., pl. -la (-lə).
any of various anatomical structures that hook, clasp, or bind individual parts, as seeds or organs, together or in place.
[1815–25; < New Latin; Latin retināculum tether =retin(ēre) to hold fast, retain + -ā- (from v. stems ending in -ā-; compare hibernaculum) + -culum -cule2]
Translations

ret·i·nac·u·lum

n. retináculo, estructura que retiene un órgano o un tejido en su lugar.
References in periodicals archive ?
At the ankle joint, the fascia blends with both the flexor and extensor retinacula. This is of great mechanical importance as the retinacula closely bind the assorted tendons, which pass across the ankle joint, to the underlying bony tissues of the joint and keep the tendons from bowstringing during dorsiflexion and plantar flexion.
The scarred portion of the tendon is debrided along with any redundancy of the medial and lateral retinacula. A Cobb elevator is used to release the superficial and deep aspects of the quadriceps tendon from the surrounding tissues (Figure 1(b)).
The extrinsic muscles are categorized into the three groups passing inside the extensor, flexor, and fibular retinacula that belong to muscles in the anterior, posterior, and lateral regions of leg, respectively.
This is referred to as the medial and lateral patella retinacula.
There are "broad areas of subchondral bone marrow edema." The patellar retinacula are intact, as are my cruciate ligaments, quadriceps, and patellar tendons.
Immunohistochemical staining of ankle retinacula revealed small nerve fibers and corpuscles within ankle retinacula [44].
Possible pain generators include the anterior synovium, infrapatellar fat pad, subchondral bone, or retinacula.