retrenchment


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re·trench·ment 1

 (rĭ-trĕnch′mənt)
n.
1. A cutting down or back; reduction.
2. A curtailment of expenses.

re·trench·ment 2

 (rĭ-trĕnch′mənt)
n.
The act of consolidating one's strength, as for further efforts.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

retrenchment

(rɪˈtrɛntʃmənt)
n
1. (Banking & Finance) the act of reducing expenditure in order to improve financial stability
2. (Fortifications) an extra interior fortification to reinforce outer walls
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

re•trench•ment

(rɪˈtrɛntʃ mənt)

n.
1. the act of retrenching; a cutting down or off, as by the reduction of expenses.
2. an interior work within a fortification, to which a garrison may retreat.
[1590–1600; < French retrenchement. See retrench, -ment]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.retrenchment - entrenchment consisting of an additional interior fortification to prolong the defense
entrenchment, intrenchment - an entrenched fortification; a position protected by trenches
2.retrenchment - the reduction of expenditures in order to become financially stable
saving, economy - an act of economizing; reduction in cost; "it was a small economy to walk to work every day"; "there was a saving of 50 cents"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

retrenchment

Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002
Translations

retrenchment

[rɪˈtrentʃmənt] N
1. (frm) (= cutting back) → racionalización f de gastos, recorte m de gastos
2. (Mil) → empalizada f interior
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

retrenchment

n (of expenditure)Einschränkung f, → Kürzung f; (of personnel)Einsparung f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

retrenchment

[rɪˈtrɛntʃmənt] nriduzione f delle spese
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
She consulted, and in a degree was influenced by her in marking out the scheme of retrenchment which was at last submitted to Sir Walter.
She considered it as an act of indispensable duty to clear away the claims of creditors with all the expedition which the most comprehensive retrenchments could secure, and saw no dignity in anything short of it.
In front of the table benches arranged in zigzag form, like the circumvallations of a retrenchment, formed a succession of bastions and curtains set apart for the use of the members of the club; and on this especial evening one might say, "All the world was on the ramparts." The president was sufficiently well known, however, for all to be assured that he would not put his colleagues to discomfort without some very strong motive.
And to another chief, who broke down under the excessive strain of retrenchment:-
When you have paid us our price, there will be need of retrenchment. Dismiss your guards now, and cut down your expenses.
She was grieved beyond measure to part with Briggs, but her means required that she should practise every retrenchment, and her sorrow was mitigated by the idea that her dear Briggs would be far better provided for by her generous patron than in her humble home.
It was taken for granted that Poiret would not be replaced, and that would be a retrenchment. Little La Billardiere had already departed.
PJV's retrenchment and employment policies are likely to play a significant role in the success or failure of overall closure policy.
So, in accepting alarmist viewpoints in haste our politicians are maybe seeking to solve the wrong problem as they blindly condone technological retrenchment to the disadvantage of humankind.
Roy Ayliffe, director of professional practice at the CIPS, said "The health of the UK services economy showed some signs of recuperation in April as the rate of retrenchment eased to its weakest in eight months." But he also noted that service jobs are still being lost at an exceptional rate.
In Tong Tong's case however, his company has tried to pre-empt all employees on the possibility of retrenchment. In addition, the CEO himself spoke to the employees, explaining to them the financial difficulties which the company was facing, as well as the few alternatives which the company might take.
"The New Year spirit was decidedly muted among UK constructors, amid reports of evertoughening market conditions - further falls in global demand resulted in the most severe retrenchment in the PMI's 11-year history," said Roy Ayliffe, director of professional practice at CIPS.