retributory


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Related to retributory: vindicatory, retributively

ret·ri·bu·tion

 (rĕt′rə-byo͞o′shən)
n.
1. Punishment administered in return for a wrong committed.
2. Theology Punishment or reward distributed in a future life based on performance in this one.

[Middle English retribucion, repayment, reward, from Old French retribution, from Late Latin retribūtiō, retribūtiōn-, from Latin retribūtus, past participle of retribuere, to pay back : re-, re- + tribuere, to grant; see tribe.]

re·trib′u·tive (rĭ-trĭb′yə-tĭv), re·trib′u·to·ry (-tôr′ē) adj.
re·trib′u·tive·ly adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.retributory - of or relating to or having the nature of retribution; "retributive justice demands an eye for an eye"
punitive, punitory - inflicting punishment; "punitive justice"; "punitive damages"
2.retributory - given or inflicted in requital according to merits or deserts; "retributive justice"
just - used especially of what is legally or ethically right or proper or fitting; "a just and lasting peace"- A.Lincoln; "a kind and just man"; "a just reward"; "his just inheritance"
References in periodicals archive ?
'Empirical evidence shows that neither the death penalty nor corporal punishment has been effective as a retributory and deterrent sentence,' its president George Varughese said in a statement.
The European Court of Human Rights recalled the conclusion of the European Committee for the Prevention of Torture and Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment, which deemed it "inhuman to imprison someone for life with no hope of release." (228) Europe likewise insists that rehabilitation form the centerpiece of penology and bars punishment where it serves only retributory purposes.
After drifting through rooms replete with images of rumpled bed linen, one could almost hear the approach of retributory tumbrils.
He gets beaten up, his camels are stolen and his own anger turns into an Othello-like retributory rage.
Whereas some retribution is unavoidably sacrificed by pardoning the administrative and/or criminal actions of the whistleblower, part of the retributory "payback effect" is safeguarded with the preservation of reparatory justice through civil litigation.