retrodict

retrodict

(ˌrɛtrəˈdɪkt)
vb (tr)
to make estimates about (the past) using information from the present or other events from the past. Used in fields such as archaeology, climatology, and financial analysis
References in periodicals archive ?
Given this integration between the two periods based on tangible evidence, is it not perhaps also possible to retrodict aspects of Iron Age beliefs and inheritance rules from the early historic texts?
In the absence of detailed maps, we used models of these processes, constrained by available geophysical and geodetic data sets, to retrodict shoreline changes and the rate of land emergence over the last two centuries within the boundaries specified by Treaty No.
In particular, we retrodict past shoreline locations in the western James Bay area based on boundaries specified by Treaty No.
In the sciences, this approach arguably works for much of climate science, which is less about why things occur than about whether we can accurately retrodict, portray, and predict (Edwards, 2010).
These students and the psychology professor would have accepted Laplace's contention that a calculating demon, who knew all the laws of nature and all the facts obtaining at any given moment, could predict every future event or retrodict every past event.
If one assumes that this scheme is correct, one should be able to retrodict subsequent developments that should take place as the result of this systemic collapse.
It would have been extremely difficult, despite the fact that both paintings are made entirely of stripes, to have predicted a work like Molloy on the basis of Red on Cream-or, for that matter, to retrodict from Molloy to the painting of 1976.
To quote just one of them, if I find two gases in a state of being well mixed, I can predict that they will remain well mixed, but I cannot retrodict that they were so in the past.
And then, through the late forties and into the fifties, hues get added, the anatomical forms, still disjoint -like detached grins - begin to reimply the figure, slowly, through painting after painting, and converge on Woman I of 1950-52, where we begin to be able to retrodict to breasts and bellies in works that may have seemed at the time abstract.
Also, his conclusion is confirmed by history; just as Feinstein's theorem retrodicts, no deterministic and exact algorithm that solves SUBSET-SUM has ever been found to run faster than the Meet-in-the-Middle algorithm, which was discoveredin 1974 [10,15].