retrodictive

retrodictive

(ˌrɛtrəˈdɪktɪv)
adj
of or relating to retrodicting or retrodiction
References in periodicals archive ?
Indirect Illocutionary Act: This statement is indirectly retrodictive.
Indirect Illocutionary Act: These statements are retrodictive.
Indirect Illocutionary Acts: The statements are constative retrodictive.
Indirect Illocutionary Acts: The statements are indirectly retrodictive.
Indirect Illocutionary Act: The statement is indirectly retrodictive.
Even if such a predictive project is not realized, retrodictive rhetorical studies can contribute to understanding how policies and actions may be justified after the fact and how these justifications structure responses.
The fact is any historical study of documents from the ancient eastern Mediterranean is a retrodictive work of comparison.
This field of enfolded but also outreaching relations, many of which are more complex than dyadic relations of action and reaction, effort and resistance, offers the means by which to evaluate the reliability of at least some of our predictive and retrodictive signs.
This problem seems to me an insuperable barrier to using the retrodictive tests of naturalism.
By Hermitian reversibility of a transition amplitude (replacing Bayesian reversibility of a transition probability) the retrodictive and retroactive aspects of decoding (measuring, retroparing) are made all the more radical.
Satan also misrepresents past events (a kind of retrodictive imprudence), claiming for example that the rebel forces "shook" God's throne and that God "doubted his Empire" (PL I, 105, 114), as he incorrectly assesses the devils' present condition:
Be that as it may, in the light of those deaths from apparently nutritious bread, there is obviously something fishy about a theory like T [feet], whatever its retrodictive adequacy, whose predictive consequences are indistinguishable from the now obviously flawed theory that all bread nourishes.