revenue tariff


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Related to revenue tariff: protective tariff

revenue tariff

n.
A tariff imposed chiefly to generate public revenue.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

revenue tariff

n
(Economics) a tariff for the purpose of producing public revenue. Compare protective tariff
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

rev′enue tar`iff


n.
a tariff or duty imposed on imports primarily to produce public revenue.
[1810–20, Amer.]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.revenue tariff - a tariff imposed to raise revenue
tariff, duty - a government tax on imports or exports; "they signed a treaty to lower duties on trade between their countries"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Ranking the optimum tariff and the maximum revenue tariff. Journal of |International Economics, 7(1), 73-79.
Ranking the optimum tariff and the maximum revenue tariff in vertically related markets.
Its elitist image keeps interest relatively low among the general public, while a 23.5 per cent revenue tariff prevents the industry from developing more affordable public courses.
If a tariff's primary purpose is to generate tax revenue for a country, it is a revenue tariff. In many cases, a tariff will have both protective and revenue objectives.
A protective tariff generally is levied at a higher rate than is a revenue tariff. The reason is that a protective tariff is designed to protect a country's domestic products and industries and, therefore, will be of a relatively high magnitude to make prices of imported products noncompetitive against domestic products.
Their growth is paralyzed: whilst they are mere suburbs of Northern cities." (1) When the Confederacy formulated its new Constitution in April 1861, it reinforced its free trade image by prohibiting "any duties or taxes on importations from foreign nations to be laid to promote or foster any branch of industry." With the passage of the Confederate revenue tariff of 15 percent the following summer--significantly lower than U.S.
Virginia secessionists eagerly endorsed a Confederate "revenue tariff" that also would provide "incidental" protection, giving manufacturers in the Old Dominion an important advantage over Northern competitors.
This paper intends to show that growth will not necessarily increase the tariff revenue of a country, assuming that the country always imposes a maximum revenue tariff. If there is an increase in import demand after growth, the maximum tariff revenue will increase.
The purpose of this paper is to find out if the above proposition also holds for the maximum revenue tariff. In other words, this paper intends to find out if the tariff revenue of a country will always increase after growth if the country always imposes a maximum revenue tariff (2).
Research findings that show significant gains in manufacturing activity before 1880 are consistent with a belief that the revenue tariff, struck at various levels from 15 to 17.5 percent during the 1850s, 1860s, and early 1870s, afforded sufficient protection (together with natural factors like transport costs) to promote Canadian manufacturing growth.
tariffs were unconstitutional; only revenue tariffs were constitutionally sanctioned.
But as I have argued ("The Myth of Free Trade Britain and Fortress France: Tariffs and Trade in the Nineteenth Century," Journal of Economic History 51 [March 1991]: 23-46) and subsequent research has revealed, the distinction between revenue tariffs and protective tariffs is not easy to make.