revenue tariff

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revenue tariff

n.
A tariff imposed chiefly to generate public revenue.

revenue tariff

n
(Economics) a tariff for the purpose of producing public revenue. Compare protective tariff

rev′enue tar`iff


n.
a tariff or duty imposed on imports primarily to produce public revenue.
[1810–20, Amer.]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.revenue tariff - a tariff imposed to raise revenue
tariff, duty - a government tax on imports or exports; "they signed a treaty to lower duties on trade between their countries"
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References in periodicals archive ?
tariffs were unconstitutional; only revenue tariffs were constitutionally sanctioned.
But as I have argued ("The Myth of Free Trade Britain and Fortress France: Tariffs and Trade in the Nineteenth Century," Journal of Economic History 51 [March 1991]: 23-46) and subsequent research has revealed, the distinction between revenue tariffs and protective tariffs is not easy to make.
Nowhere is this more evident than in his careful teasing out of Conservative and Liberal party positions on the tariff: on the one hand, the Conservatives were hesitant to embrace protectionism as long as renewal of reciprocity was still possible (and preferable to many) but responded quickly when the protectionist fever mounted; the Liberals, on the other hand, tried to steer cautiously (but unsuccessfully) among free trade, reciprocity, revenue tariffs, and selective "incidental protection.
Perhaps our attention ought to be focused on the "incidental protection' associated with the ostensibly revenue tariffs of an earlier period.
With the passage of the Confederate revenue tariff of 15 percent the following summer--significantly lower than U.
Confederate Virginians, however, realized that a revenue tariff, however low, would offer important incidental protection for a wide range of goods.
To accomplish this end, they recommended a revenue tariff that would provide a moderate degree of protection for infant industries.
Virginia political economist George Tucker produced one of the earliest statements of support for developing "manufactures" in the South through a moderate revenue tariff.