revisionist


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re·vi·sion·ism

 (rĭ-vĭzh′ə-nĭz′əm)
n.
1. Advocacy of the revision of an accepted, usually long-standing view, theory, or doctrine, especially a revision of historical events and movements.
2. A recurrent tendency within the Communist movement to revise Marxist theory in such a way as to provide justification for a retreat from the revolutionary to the reformist position.

re·vi′sion·ist adj. & n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.revisionist - a Communist who tries to rewrite Marxism to justify a retreat from the revolutionary position
commie, communist - a socialist who advocates communism
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

revisionist

[rɪˈvɪʒənɪst]
A. ADJrevisionista
B. Nrevisionista mf
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

revisionist

nRevisionist(in) m(f)
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

revisionist

[rɪˈvɪʒənɪst] adj & n (Pol) → revisionista (m/f)
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
The framework for evaluating this issue is the division of the world into revisionist versus status quo states.
When his family immigrated to the United States in 1939 and settled in New York, he remained a politically active Revisionist as a member of its youth movement Betar.
McMaster and his team deserve credit for clear expression of the threat to the United States from autocratic, revisionist powers, especially Russia.
security and prosperity are vitally dependent upon supporting allies against the encroachment by "revisionist" states (those intent upon overturning the established geopolitical order) on the periphery of Eurasia, stretching "from the Baltic Sea to the Black Sea in Europe, through the Levant and Persian Gulf to the Indian Ocean and up through the littoral Asia to the Sea of Japan."
At the center of this story is the short-lived alliance between the Polish government and the Zionist Revisionist Movement during the late 1930s, explored in the book's first four chapters (the third titled "The Promise of Palestine") and revisited in the conclusion.
Mitchell profiles leaders of the Revisionist Zionist political party Likud, which been the dominant party in Israeli politics since 2001 and one of two important parties since Likud was founded in 1973.
Marston's Revisionist Craft Lager, 5% ABV, 500ml bottle, available at Tesco Marston's Brewery can trace its origins back to 1834 and now operates five breweries throughout England.
He implied that I "returned the favor" of a kind review by Maurice--whom I knew well and liked enormously--by including him in a list of "revisionist historians" alongside Holocaust-denier David Irving.
Still firmly in the revisionist camp, which challenges assertions of European civilization's inherent advantage in the political, economic, technological, and military realms, after more extensively exploring Chinese, Dutch, and other sources regarding Koxinga, the author nonetheless comes to see that the orthodox and revisionist views are as entwined as were the destinies of the Zheng family, beginning with Koxinga's father Zheng Zhilong, and the Dutch on Taiwan.
There seems to be some confusion between licensing and registering texts, for example, and in discussing revisionist and post-revisionist debates over early modern censorship the differences between these positions tends to be unclear.
Revisionist historians, particularly on the German side, have argued this was not necessarily the case.
Louis, Missouri) explains the recent concept of four theological orientations, or zones: orthodox, liberal, neo-orthodox, and revisionist. She looks at the shift from the neo-orthodox zone to the revisionist zone, beginning with a theology articulated by Hendrick Kraemer (1888-1965) in the West, then theological figures outside the Western Christian centers.