revolt

(redirected from revolted)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Legal, Idioms, Encyclopedia.

re·volt

 (rĭ-vōlt′)
v. re·volt·ed, re·volt·ing, re·volts
v.intr.
1. To attempt to overthrow the authority of the state; rebel.
2. To oppose or refuse to accept something: revolting against high taxes.
3. To feel disgust or repugnance: was revolted by the gory movie.
v.tr.
To fill with disgust or abhorrence; repel. See Synonyms at disgust.
n.
1. An uprising, especially against state authority; a rebellion.
2. An act of protest or rejection.
3. The state of a person or persons in rebellion: students in revolt over administrative policies.

[French revolter, from Italian rivoltare, to turn round, from Vulgar Latin *revolvitāre, frequentative of Latin revolvere, to turn over; see revolve.]

re·volt′er n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

revolt

(rɪˈvəʊlt)
n
1. a rebellion or uprising against authority
2. in revolt in the process or state of rebelling
vb
3. (intr) to rise up in rebellion against authority
4. (usually passive) to feel or cause to feel revulsion, disgust, or abhorrence
[C16: from French révolter to revolt, from Old Italian rivoltare to overturn, ultimately from Latin revolvere to roll back, revolve]
reˈvolter n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

re•volt

(rɪˈvoʊlt)

v.i.
1. to break away from or rise against constituted authority, as by open rebellion; rebel: to revolt against the government.
2. to refuse to accept or be subjected to some authority, condition, etc.
3. to turn away in mental rebellion, disgust, or abhorrence: to revolt from eating meat.
4. to feel horror or aversion.
v.t.
5. to affect with disgust or abhorrence.
n.
6. an act of revolting; insurrection or rebellion.
7. an expression or movement of spirited protest or dissent.
[1540–50; (v.) < Middle French revolter < Italian rivoltare to turn around < Vulgar Latin *revolvitāre, frequentative of Latin revolvere to roll back, unroll, revolve; (n.) < French révolte < Italian rivolta, derivative of rivoltare]
re•volt′er, n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

revolt


Past participle: revolted
Gerund: revolting

Imperative
revolt
revolt
Present
I revolt
you revolt
he/she/it revolts
we revolt
you revolt
they revolt
Preterite
I revolted
you revolted
he/she/it revolted
we revolted
you revolted
they revolted
Present Continuous
I am revolting
you are revolting
he/she/it is revolting
we are revolting
you are revolting
they are revolting
Present Perfect
I have revolted
you have revolted
he/she/it has revolted
we have revolted
you have revolted
they have revolted
Past Continuous
I was revolting
you were revolting
he/she/it was revolting
we were revolting
you were revolting
they were revolting
Past Perfect
I had revolted
you had revolted
he/she/it had revolted
we had revolted
you had revolted
they had revolted
Future
I will revolt
you will revolt
he/she/it will revolt
we will revolt
you will revolt
they will revolt
Future Perfect
I will have revolted
you will have revolted
he/she/it will have revolted
we will have revolted
you will have revolted
they will have revolted
Future Continuous
I will be revolting
you will be revolting
he/she/it will be revolting
we will be revolting
you will be revolting
they will be revolting
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been revolting
you have been revolting
he/she/it has been revolting
we have been revolting
you have been revolting
they have been revolting
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been revolting
you will have been revolting
he/she/it will have been revolting
we will have been revolting
you will have been revolting
they will have been revolting
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been revolting
you had been revolting
he/she/it had been revolting
we had been revolting
you had been revolting
they had been revolting
Conditional
I would revolt
you would revolt
he/she/it would revolt
we would revolt
you would revolt
they would revolt
Past Conditional
I would have revolted
you would have revolted
he/she/it would have revolted
we would have revolted
you would have revolted
they would have revolted
Collins English Verb Tables © HarperCollins Publishers 2011
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.revolt - organized opposition to authorityrevolt - organized opposition to authority; a conflict in which one faction tries to wrest control from another
conflict, struggle, battle - an open clash between two opposing groups (or individuals); "the harder the conflict the more glorious the triumph"--Thomas Paine; "police tried to control the battle between the pro- and anti-abortion mobs"
insurgence, insurgency - an organized rebellion aimed at overthrowing a constituted government through the use of subversion and armed conflict
intifada, intifadah - an uprising by Palestinian Arabs (in both the Gaza Strip and the West Bank) against Israel in the late 1980s and again in 2000; "the first intifada ended when Israel granted limited autonomy to the Palestine National Authority in 1993"
mutiny - open rebellion against constituted authority (especially by seamen or soldiers against their officers)
Verb1.revolt - make revolution; "The people revolted when bread prices tripled again"
rebel, rise up, arise, rise - take part in a rebellion; renounce a former allegiance
2.revolt - fill with distaste; "This spoilt food disgusts me"
excite, stir, stimulate - stir feelings in; "stimulate my appetite"; "excite the audience"; "stir emotions"
nauseate, turn one's stomach, sicken - upset and make nauseated; "The smell of the food turned the pregnant woman's stomach"; "The mold on the food sickened the diners"
3.revolt - cause aversion in; offend the moral sense of; "The pornographic pictures sickened us"
repel, repulse - be repellent to; cause aversion in
outrage, scandalise, scandalize, appal, appall, shock, offend - strike with disgust or revulsion; "The scandalous behavior of this married woman shocked her friends"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

revolt

noun
verb
1. rebel, rise up, resist, defect, mutiny, take to the streets, take up arms (against) The townspeople revolted.
2. disgust, offend, turn off (informal), sicken, repel, repulse, nauseate, gross out (U.S. slang), shock, turn your stomach, make your flesh creep, give you the creeps (informal) He entirely revolts me.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

revolt

verb
1. To refuse allegiance to and oppose by force a government or ruling authority:
mutiny, rebel, rise (up).
2. To offend the senses or feelings of:
noun
Organized opposition intended to change or overthrow existing authority:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
تَمَرُّدثَوْرَهيَثوريُثير إشْمِئْزاز
vzpouraznechutitvzbouřenívzbouřit se
gøre oprøroprøroprøre
bunitipobunapobunitirevolt
undorodik
gera uppreisnuppreisnvekja viîbjóî hjá
apimtas pasibjaurėjimokeliantis pasibjaurėjimąmaištavimas
dumpisdumpotiesizraisīt riebumusacelšanāssacelties
vzbúrenie
uporupreti se
pobuniti
iğrendirmekisyanisyan etmeisyan etmek

revolt

[rɪˈvəʊlt]
A. N (= insurrection) → levantamiento m, revuelta f, sublevación f; (= rejection of authority) → rebelión f
a popular revoltun levantamiento or una revuelta popular
southern cities are in (open) revolt against the regimelas ciudades del sur se han sublevado contra el régimen
students are in (open) revolt against the new examination systemlos estudiantes se han rebelado contra el nuevo sistema de exámenes
to rise (up) in revoltsublevarse, rebelarse
B. VT (= disgust) → dar asco a, repugnar
I was revolted by the sightla escena me dio asco or me repugnó
C. VI (= rebel) → sublevarse, rebelarse (against contra)
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

revolt

[rɪˈvəʊlt]
n
(= insurrection) → révolte f
armed revolt → révolte armée
to rise in revolt → se révolter
(against system, party line)révolte f
in open revolt → en révolte ouverte
vi
(= rise up) → se révolter
to revolt against [+ dictatorship, foreign rule, tyrant] → se révolter contre
[backbencher, teenager] → se révolter
to revolt against [+ system, discipline, parents] → se révolter contre
vt
(= disgust physically) → dégoûter
The smell of decay revolted her → L'odeur de la pourriture la dégoûtait.
(= disgust morally) → révolter
He was revolted by what they had done → Il était révolté par ce qu'ils avaient fait.
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

revolt

nEmpörung f, → Revolte f, → Aufstand m; to rise (up) in revolteinen Aufstand or eine Revolte machen, sich erheben; to be in revolt (against)rebellieren (gegen)
vi
(= rebel) (→ gegen) → revoltieren, rebellieren
(= be disgusted) (→ bei, gegen) (one’s nature, sensibilities) → sich empören; (stomach)rebellieren
vtabstoßen, anekeln (inf); I was revolted by ites hat mich angeekelt (inf)or abgestoßen
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

revolt

[rɪˈvəʊlt]
1. nrivolta, ribellione f
to be in open revolt → essere in aperta rivolta
2. vt(far) rivoltare
to be revolted by sth → provare disgusto per qc
3. vi
a. (rebel) to revolt (against sb/sth)ribellarsi (a qn/qc)
b. (feel disgust) to revolt at or againstrivoltarsi (a or di fronte a)
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

revolt

(rəˈvəult) verb
1. to rebel (against a government etc). The army revolted against the dictator.
2. to disgust. His habits revolt me.
noun
1. the act of rebelling. The peasants rose in revolt.
2. a rebellion.
reˈvolted adjective
having a feeling of disgust. I felt quite revolted at the sight.
reˈvolting adjective
causing a feeling of disgust. revolting food.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
The way in which he had been managing his land revolted him and had lost all attraction for him.
When from dark error's subjugation My words of passionate exhortation Had wrenched thy fainting spirit free; And writhing prone in thine affliction Thou didst recall with malediction The vice that had encompassed thee: And when thy slumbering conscience, fretting By recollection's torturing flame, Thou didst reveal the hideous setting Of thy life's current ere I came: When suddenly I saw thee sicken, And weeping, hide thine anguished face, Revolted, maddened, horror-stricken, At memories of foul disgrace.
Due to Russian repression of information, this book, first published in 1954, was for many years the only scholarly source on the 1916 massacre of 250,000 Central Asians who were killed by the Russian Army when they revolted against the enforced draft into WWI.