revolving door


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Related to revolving door: Revolving door syndrome

revolving door

n.
1. A door, especially at the entrance of a building, typically made of three or four rigid upright sections joined at right angles and rotating about a central upright pivot.
2.
a. A recurring pattern of events or problems: a revolving door of drug addiction and homelessness.
b. A situation in which people remain or work only a short time before going elsewhere.
c. A situation in which people with experience in an industry take government jobs in agencies that set policy for that industry and in which government employees take private-sector jobs in order to use their connections and knowledge to favorably influence government policy regarding their industry.

re·volv′ing-door′ adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

revolving door

n
1. (Building) a door that rotates about a central vertical axis, esp one with four leaves arranged at right angles to each other, thereby excluding draughts
2.
a. informal a tendency to change personnel on a frequent basis
b. (as modifier): a revolving-door band.
3. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy)
a. informal the hiring of former government employees by private companies with which they had dealings when they worked for the government
b. (as modifier): revolving-door consultancies.
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

revolv′ing door′


n.
an entrance door to a building consisting of usually four rigid leaves in the form of a cross rotating about a central vertical pivot in the doorway, designed to keep out drafts.
[1905–10]

revolv′ing-door′


adj.
1. (of a company, institution, or organization) having a high turnover of employees, members, patients, etc.
2. of or pertaining to a practice in which government officials return to positions in private companies that do business with the government.
[1965–70]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.revolving door - an organization or institution with a high rate of turnover of personnel or membershiprevolving door - an organization or institution with a high rate of turnover of personnel or membership
social group - people sharing some social relation
2.revolving door - a door consisting of four orthogonal partitions that rotate about a central pivot; a door designed to equalize the air pressure in tall buildings
door - a swinging or sliding barrier that will close the entrance to a room or building or vehicle; "he knocked on the door"; "he slammed the door as he left"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
porta giratória
vrtljiva vrata

revolving door

nporta girevole
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
With his free arm, the Persian drew the young man to his chest and, suddenly, the mirror turned, in a blinding daze of cross-lights: it turned like one of those revolving doors which have lately been fixed to the entrances of most restaurants, it turned, carrying Raoul and the Persian with it and suddenly hurling them from the full light into the deepest darkness.
PRISONS now effectivel have a "revolving door" wit little being done to prevent re-offending, Plaid Cymru's parliamentary leader sai yesterday
Yes, my friends, we are back to taking one more turn through the revolving door headquartered in Kansas City, Mo., and otherwise known as the National Association of Insurance Commissioners.
"First and foremost, I don't always decide who stops the revolving door. But if they keep the revolving door going, somewhere someone is going to have to say, 'Stop this'."
Morgan Stanley's vice chairman is Tom Nides, who went through the revolving door from the Clinton-led State Department to his current position on Wall Street.
Until prison represents real punishment there will be no change for the "revolving door" brigade.
"This industry is a revolving door and I've been there.
An MIT study, Modifying Habits Towards Sustainability: A Study of Revolving Door Usage on the MIT Campus, considered the effects of revolving doors at several locations on campus.
A sensor in a revolving door that caused a fatal accident Friday in Tokyo was apparently configured so that its blind spot was not the smallest size possible, sources close to the case said Sunday.
The videos are projected on a glass revolving door in the middle of the room, one in both ends of the whole sculpture.
Without adequate attention to legal involvement as well as the associated social factors, there is danger of a "revolving door" between correctional, welfare and mental health care systems.
The terminal was closed from 0915 to about 1030 local time after a male passenger mistakenly went through a revolving door from the baggage area into the secure area without being screened.