revolving door

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Related to revolving-door: Revolving door syndrome

revolving door

n.
1. A door, especially at the entrance of a building, typically made of three or four rigid upright sections joined at right angles and rotating about a central upright pivot.
2.
a. A recurring pattern of events or problems: a revolving door of drug addiction and homelessness.
b. A situation in which people remain or work only a short time before going elsewhere.
c. A situation in which people with experience in an industry take government jobs in agencies that set policy for that industry and in which government employees take private-sector jobs in order to use their connections and knowledge to favorably influence government policy regarding their industry.

re·volv′ing-door′ adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

revolving door

n
1. (Building) a door that rotates about a central vertical axis, esp one with four leaves arranged at right angles to each other, thereby excluding draughts
2.
a. informal a tendency to change personnel on a frequent basis
b. (as modifier): a revolving-door band.
3. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy)
a. informal the hiring of former government employees by private companies with which they had dealings when they worked for the government
b. (as modifier): revolving-door consultancies.
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

revolv′ing door′


n.
an entrance door to a building consisting of usually four rigid leaves in the form of a cross rotating about a central vertical pivot in the doorway, designed to keep out drafts.
[1905–10]

revolv′ing-door′


adj.
1. (of a company, institution, or organization) having a high turnover of employees, members, patients, etc.
2. of or pertaining to a practice in which government officials return to positions in private companies that do business with the government.
[1965–70]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.revolving door - an organization or institution with a high rate of turnover of personnel or membershiprevolving door - an organization or institution with a high rate of turnover of personnel or membership
social group - people sharing some social relation
2.revolving door - a door consisting of four orthogonal partitions that rotate about a central pivot; a door designed to equalize the air pressure in tall buildings
door - a swinging or sliding barrier that will close the entrance to a room or building or vehicle; "he knocked on the door"; "he slammed the door as he left"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
porta giratória
vrtljiva vrata

revolving door

nporta girevole
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
These revolving-door bans range in length from until the conclusion of the next regular session (in Maryland) to two years (in Alabama, Colorado, Florida, Iowa, Kentucky, Louisiana, Montana and New York).
To account for these incongruous results, scholars have formulated and tested a new "human-capital" theory positing that revolving-door regulators have incentives to be more aggressive toward the regulated industry as a way of signaling their qualifications to prospective industry employers.
When there are no fewer than 13 revolving-door connections between current MPs and Barclays, plus numerous parliamentary links with other banks under investigation, is it surprising that fines, rather than prison sentences, are the order of the day?
Ratings agency Moody's downgraded Japan's credit rating by one notch, blaming a build up of borrowing and revolving-door politics for delaying efforts to cut the world's largest debt.
Sugababes have gained a reputation for their revolving-door line-up and now feature Aintree-born Heidi Range, Jade Ewen and Amelle Berrabah.
Instituting a strong conflict of interest policy with revolving-door safeguards would help erase that image..."
Prodi emerged the winner, even though his razor-thin majority has brought back the prospect of political instability in a country known for its revolving-door governments.
The revolving-door phenomenon occurs when companies a employ former employees or owners of their audit firm in accounting positions.
What are the long-term results of placing millions of mothers, fathers, brothers, sisters, aunts, uncles, husbands, and wives of Americans in a revolving-door prison industrial complex that offers few, if any, rehabilitation programs and is a huge financial burden?
In fact, there is a revolving-door syndrome among fundamentalists.
But who knows how long this particular line up will last, considering that Homme and Oliveri's creative spark draws from the spontaneity created by a revolving-door policy of band members, only time will tell.