rhabdomere


Also found in: Wikipedia.

rhabdomere

(ˈræbdəˌmɪə)
n
(Zoology) one of the many parts that makes up a rhabdom
References in periodicals archive ?
By assuming that each microvillus is a cylinder, the collective membrane area of the microvilli contained in the unit volume of the rhabdomere (Sv) was calculated as
The rhabdomere data were obtained from the central area of each retina.
In each retinula cell, the microvilli composing the rhabdomere are oriented toward the center of the rhabdom.
1980; Mayrat, 1981), including one small cell producing a rhabdomere and four other larger retinula cells (Ercolini, 1964).
The retinas of principal eyes are everted, which is to say that the light-sensitive rhabdomeres of their photoreceptors face toward incoming light, with the cell bodies positioned below (Fig.
1993), they also share a V-pattern in the rhabdomeres of the ommatidia, further supporting their relationship (Fischer et al.
Small numbers of rhabdomeres in the retina, such as 10-20 in some eyes of the ochyroceratid Speocera (Berland 1914), detect little more than movement (Homann 1971).
Sensitivity (f-number), or the eye's ability to admit light, was calculated using values for focal length (F) and the diameter of the retina (d), measured from the extremities of the rhabdomeres in each species (Opell & Ware 1987).
exotica, because rhabdomeres are frequently skewed and the axes of ommatidial groups of retinula cells are not always parallel to the axes of the dioptric structures.
moschata shows packed arrays of photoreceptor cells with microvilli, reminiscent of rhabdomeres, but without dioptric apparatus (Nishioka et al.
The epistellar body of Octopus vulgaris was later re-investigated in detail using electron microscopy and found to contain cells that have microvilli very like those found in the rhabdomeres of the extraocular photoreceptors seen in other molluscs and arthropods (Nishioka et al.
The geometrical, interleaved arrangement of microvilli from the rhabdomeres of individual photoreceptors in Palaemonetes [ILLUSTRATION FOR FIGURE 8B, C OMITTED] is replaced by a much larger, but less geometrical rhabdom in Rimicaris sp.