rhenium


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rhe·ni·um

 (rē′nē-əm)
n. Symbol Re
A rare, dense, silvery-white metallic element with a very high melting point, extracted chiefly from molybdenite and used for electrical contacts, with tungsten for high-temperature thermocouples, and as a catalyst for refining hydrocarbon fuels. Atomic number 75; atomic weight 186.2; melting point 3,185°C; boiling point 5,596°C; specific gravity 20.8 (20°C); valence 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7. See Periodic Table.

[From Latin Rhēnus, the Rhine.]

rhenium

(ˈriːnɪəm)
n
(Elements & Compounds) a dense silvery-white metallic element that has a high melting point. It occurs principally in gadolinite and molybdenite and is used, alloyed with tungsten or molybdenum, in high-temperature thermocouples. Symbol: Re; atomic no: 75; atomic wt: 186.207; valency: –1 or 1–7; relative density: 21.02; melting pt: 3186°C; boiling pt: 5596°C (est)
[C19: New Latin, from Rhēnus the Rhine]

rhe•ni•um

(ˈri ni əm)

n.
a rare metallic element of the manganese subgroup: used, because of its high melting point, in platinum-rhenium thermocouples. Symbol: Re; at. no.: 75; at. wt.: 186.2.
[< German Rhenium (1925) = Latin Rhēn(us) Rhine + -ium -ium2]

rhe·ni·um

(rē′nē-əm)
Symbol Re A very rare, dense, silvery-white metallic element with a very high melting point. It is used to make catalysts and electrical contacts. Atomic number 75. See Periodic Table.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.rhenium - a rare heavy polyvalent metallic element that resembles manganese chemically and is used in some alloysrhenium - a rare heavy polyvalent metallic element that resembles manganese chemically and is used in some alloys; is obtained as a by-product in refining molybdenum
metal, metallic element - any of several chemical elements that are usually shiny solids that conduct heat or electricity and can be formed into sheets etc.
Translations
рений
rhenium
rhenium
renio
reenium
renium
rhénium
renij
レニウム
rhenium
rhenium
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ren
rhenium
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rhenium

[ˈriːnɪəm] Nrenio m

rhenium

n (Chem) → Rhenium nt
References in periodicals archive ?
Rhenium is an important part of the economics of the CuMo Project, said Anderson.
Development of the rhenium silver color is based on PPG's "sterling silver" color platform and the company's leading automotive refinish technology.
With this background, the search for new sorbents to concentrate rhenium is actually a task of current importance.
For example, GE is concerned about the supply of rhenium, which is used in turbine blades; copper smelting produces 1 ounce of rhenium for every 120 tons of copper ore mined.
Rhenium (Re), the last naturally occurring element to be discovered, was discovered in Germany in 1925.
a Tokyo-based nonferrous metal producer, has built a factory in Kitakyushu, Fukuoka Prefecture to extract rhenium, a very rare earth element, from turbine blades of scrapped jet engines.
Kosei says it is aiming to get 2 tons of rhenium and 6 tons of tungsten from around 100 tons of scrapped components in the initial year of operation.
Chile, also the world's largest producer of copper (34%), natural nitrates (100%), iodine (58%), rhenium (52%), lithium (45%) and the fifth largest silver producer, has fifth place in Current Mineral Potential Index (Fraser Institute).
The use of radioactive rhenium (Re-188) to reduce repeat restenosis has been under development for more than a decade.
5m of its common shares to Chilean molybdenum and rhenium processor Molibdenos y Metales SA (Molymet) for about USD390m (EUR296m), the companies announced in a statement.
Alloying elements for high-temperature turbines, such as rhenium.
In addition to tungsten, the composition of the carbide phases contained nickel and rhenium (4-11 wt.