rhizoid


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rhi·zoid

 (rī′zoid′)
n.
A slender rootlike filament that grows from an alga, a fungus, or the gametophyte of a moss, liverwort, or fern, used for attachment and nourishment.

rhi′zoid′, rhi·zoi′dal (-zoid′l) adj.

rhizoid

(ˈraɪzɔɪd)
n
(Botany) any of various slender hairlike structures that function as roots in the gametophyte generation of mosses, ferns, and related plants
rhiˈzoidal adj

rhi•zoid

(ˈraɪ zɔɪd)

adj.
1. rootlike.
n.
2. (in mosses, ferns, etc.) one of the rootlike filaments by which the plant is attached to the substratum.
[1855–60; < Greek rhíz(a) root + -oid]
rhi•zoi′dal, adj.

rhi·zoid

(rī′zoid′)
A slender, root-like filament by which mosses, liverworts, fungi, and the reproductive generation of ferns attach themselves to the material in which they grow and absorb nourishment.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.rhizoid - any of various slender filaments that function as roots in mosses and ferns and fungi etcrhizoid - any of various slender filaments that function as roots in mosses and ferns and fungi etc
leak fungus, Rhizopus stolonifer, ring rot fungus - fungus causing soft watery rot in fruits and vegetables and rings of dry rot around roots of sweet potatoes
fibril, filament, strand - a very slender natural or synthetic fiber
References in periodicals archive ?
(a) Unamplified photograph of a mat collected in 2003, the arrow indicates rhizoid used to attach to a rock.
Name Surface colonies plate culture Surface Optical Form Elevation Border character 1 Irregular Raised Erose Smooth Opaque 2 Rhizoid Flat Filamentous Rough Translucent 3 Circular Raised Erose Smooth Opaque 4 Irregular Convex Undulate Smooth Opaque 5 Circular Flat Entire Smooth Translucent 6 Filamentous Flat Filamentous Rugose Translucent Name Consistency Shape Gram Stain 1 Butyrous Bacilli Negative 2 Membranous Cocci Negative 3 Butyrous Cocci Negative 4 Butyrous Bacilli Negative 5 Butyrous Bacilli Negative 6 Brittle Coccus Negative Table 2: The ability of microorganisms in nitrogen cycle.
This is supported by the wide distribution of clastic carbonate material, oolites, stromatolites and vertical branching channels (burrows or 'rhizoid' structures), sometimes even at a distance from reconstructed sea shores.
Colony characteristics of phosphate solubilizing bacterial isolates Isolate Sample (Distt Shape Edge Bilaspur, H.P.) [IH3.sub.2] Harnora Irregular Undulate [IKas.sub.4] Kasol Irregular Undulate [IH3.sub.1] Harnora Irregular Rhizoid [IH3.sub.5] Harnora Irregular Undulate [1H3.sub.4] Harnora Irregular Undulate [ID5.sub.4] Dhar Irregular Undulate [IH5.sub.1] Harnora Round.
Unlike bacteria or protozoa in the rumen, anaerobic fungi possess rhizoid filaments that penetrate feed particles, resulting in their physical breakdown (Ho et al., 1988).
Cytological and proteomic analyses of Osmunda cinnamomea germinating spores reveal characteristics of fern spore germination and rhizoid tip-growth.
Spores were considered as germinated when a first rhizoid was clearly emerged (Gabriel y Galan & Prada 2010b).
Foucault uses Borges's fable to disentangle the subtle and rhizoid movements of power and the construction of subjectivity and Baudrillard illustrates his "postmodern desert," the effacing of the metaphysics of representation and the cruising through the hyperreal by inverting Borges's parabola.
The metis female body in its formless, rhizoid, permeable and metamorphosing state is slippery, amoebic, uncontainable and unpredictable.
balachowskyi Tsacas from Madagascar are subject to infestations of the entomophagous fungus Laboulbenia curtonoti Rossi & Kirk-Spriggs (Ascomycota), a species with an elongated rhizoid which penetrates the host's cuticle (Rossi & Kirk-Spriggs 2011).