rhodomontade


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rhodomontade

(ˌrɒdəʊmɒnˈteɪd)
n
another name for rodomontade
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.rhodomontade - vain and empty boasting
boast, boasting, jactitation, self-praise - speaking of yourself in superlatives

rodomontade

also rhodomontade
noun
An act of boasting:
Informal: blow.
adjective
Characterized by or given to boasting:
verb
To talk with excessive pride:
Informal: blow.
References in classic literature ?
In fact, the good squire was a little too apt to indulge that kind of pleasantry which is generally called rhodomontade: but which may, with as much propriety, be expressed by a much shorter word; and perhaps we too often supply the use of this little monosyllable by others; since very much of what frequently passes in the world for wit and humour, should, in the strictest purity of language, receive that short appellation, which, in conformity to the well-bred laws of custom, I here suppress.
Such is the kind of swaggering and rhodomontade in which the "red men" are prone to indulge in their vainglorious moments; for, with all their vaunted taciturnity, they are vehemently prone at times to become eloquent about their exploits, and to sound their own trumpet.
He addressed himself directly to his guest with a torrent of rhodomontade; and the young man, reduced to helpless silence and shy, nodded his head at intervals to show that he took an intelligent interest.
Accordingly, in the panegyric (56) of cold spirits, Washington disappears in a cloud of commonplaces; in the rhodomontade (57) of boiling patriots, he expires in the agonies of rant.
According to the O.E.D., the term "rhodomontade" or "rodomontade" first appeared in English literature in the early 1600s and was defined as "boastful or inflated language." The word "rhodomontade" appears in Northanger Abbey near the end of the novel, in the narrator's summary of John Thorpe's diatribe to General Tilney about Catherine and his former friend James Morland.
Here was a form (ottava rima) flexible enough to accommodate any tone or effect, a theme at once traditional (the education sentimentale of the libertine) and radical (morality as relative rather than absolute), a mode capable of grandeur or farce, rhodomontade or garrulous intimacy, satire or passionate sincerity: a poem, in short, which, like its author, was both committed to and detached from the contemporary world.