rhotacism


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rho·ta·cism

 (rō′tə-sĭz′əm)
n.
1. The change of a sound such as (s) or (z) to (r) in the history of a language, such as the change of Proto-Indo-European intervocalic s to r in Latin, resulting in alternations such as that seen between the singular noun genus, "kind, sort" and its plural, genera. Also called rhoticism.
2.
a. The inability to articulate the (r) sound as a rhotic consonant.
b. The substitution of the (r) sound with another sound, such as (w), because of this inability.
3. The articulation of a sound other than (r) as (r), especially the articulation of (z) as (r).

[German Rhotacismus, from Byzantine Greek rhōtakismos, excessive or erroneous use of the letter rho : Greek rhō, the letter rho; see rho + Greek -takizein in iōtakizein, to pronounce the letters eta and upsilon with the sound of iota (iōta, iota + -izein, verb suff., with inserted -k- from attikizein, to speak Attic Greek, and soloikizein, to speak substandard Greek, make a solecism).]

rhotacism

(ˈrəʊtəˌsɪzəm)
n
(Phonetics & Phonology) excessive use or idiosyncratic pronunciation of r
[C19: from New Latin rhōtacismus, from Greek rhōtakizein (verb) from the letter rho]
ˈrhotacist n
ˌrhotaˈcistic adj

rhotacism

Phonetics.
1. a misarticulation of the sound r or the substitution of another sound for it.
2. Cf. lambdacism. substitution of the sound sound r for another sound, as that of l.
2. the excessive use of the sound r.
3. Phonology. replacement of the sound z or s by r in Indo-European languages, as German wesen, English were. — rhotacize, v. — rhotacistic, adj.
See also: Linguistics
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
Why would a girl resident in a rural district, whose job frequently requires popular literacy, show a speech different from what is expected to find in a rural zone, since it does not present the variables associated with this type of expression, like rhotacism or the change of -LH- for IOD, for example?
I wonder if this could be an example of rhotacism (or at least partial-rhotacism) in Urartian?
Mr Rodrigues, also 24, realised it was Wilson because of his speech impediment known as rhotacism. They had rowed over a girl.
Known for her rhotacism, a minor speech impediment which affects her pronunciation of "r", she's whisked viewers through the dark days of the 17th century, the Regency period and, as of this week, the royal wardrobe of old, which sees her exploring the clothing selections of our kings and queens over the past 400 years.
WOY HODGSON is a really nice - if not terribly interesting character - but quite clearly he has a slight case of rhotacism.
Albright stresses that in older stages of Latin, many nouns exhibited paradigmatic s ~ r alternations created by rhotacism in suffixed forms, and that in the period immediately before Classical Latin, these s ~ r alternations were eliminated by extending the r to the nominative form.
Rhotacism is beyond them all - just as people who lisp can't say lisp and dyslexics can't spell dyslexia.
2001 "On Rs, rhotacism and paleophony", Journal of the International Phonetic Association 31/2: 171-185.
1987 "Intervocalic /d/ rhotacism in Dominican Spanish: a non linear analysis".
Social-situational (for example assimilation, hypercorrections) and dialect variables (for example lenition, rhotacism) are distinguished, but to specify which variant might have been used when, and by whom to whom, is impossible in the present state of our knowledge.
A conspicuous areal sound change common to Tati is rhotacism of postvocalic d, thus, the endonym juhur < Pers.