rhyme royal


Also found in: Thesaurus, Wikipedia.
Related to rhyme royal: Spenserian stanza, Ballad meter

rhyme royal

n.
1. A form of verse having stanzas with seven lines in iambic pentameter rhyming ababbcc.
2. One of these stanzas.

rhyme royal

n
(Poetry) prosody a stanzaic form introduced into English verse by Chaucer, consisting of seven lines of iambic pentameter rhyming a b a b b c c

rhyme′ roy′al


n.
a verse form consisting of seven-line stanzas in iambic pentameter, rhyming ababbcc.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.rhyme royal - a stanza form having seven lines of iambic pentameter; introduced by Chaucer
stanza - a fixed number of lines of verse forming a unit of a poem
References in periodicals archive ?
One of two English translations of De Mulieribus Claris before modern times, it consists of 1792 lines of English verse in seven-line stanzas of the "rhyme royal" type.
He attempts to combine clear meaning with complex poetic form--to demonstrate that he can both write with clarity and simultaneously execute, craftsman-like, the rhyme royal stanzas.
Today's bets Methaaly 2.00 Wolverhampton 1pt win Rhyme Royal 4.15 Southwell 1pt win Unex Picasso 4.45 Southwell 1pt win DESPITE a hiccup at Wolverhampton on Saturday the all-weather is living up to its name, and while jumps enthusiasts will probably find the prospect of watching paint dry more appealing than an afternoon of Polytrack and Fibresand action, rather that than no racing at all.
co.uk Maiden Handicap, but Rhyme Royal may still have more to offer.
Not a lot jumps off the page in the Book Your Tickets On-Line At southwell-racecourse.co.uk Maiden Handicap, but Rhyme Royal may still have more to offer.
It is fair to say not a lot jumps off the page in the Book Your Tickets On-Line At southwell-racecourse.co.uk Maiden Handicap (4.15), but Rhyme Royal may still have more to offer.
Kerrigan and Duncan-Jones persuade Montgomery to regard the female-voiced, rhyme royal lament A Lover's Complaint as belonging to the Sonnets.
There are some 720 entries arranged alphabetically and these include entries for Chaucer's works, the most important fictional characters, writers who influenced Chaucer or were influenced by him, people and places important in Chaucer's life and works, 'relevant genres and literary traditions (rhyme royal, dream vision, beast fable, etc)', the most important manuscripts and editions of his works, the leading Chaucerian scholars and editors (up to 1950) and those historical, social or political events which are relevant to a full understanding of Chaucer.
In a wonderful study of actors' doubling of roles in these plays for efficient touring in addition to acting style, textual analysis, and what can be guessed about their dramaturgy, the authors postulate that the company's reliance on the visual acting and a "medley technique"--use of fourteeners, quatrains and rhymed stanzas like rhyme royal, steady, end-stopped, iambic rhythms, prose, and blank verse--in effect created "bad" quartos, that is, textual performances of plays better seen than read which challenged the most efficient scribe for accurate transcription.
The Floure and the Leafe distinguishes itself from Middle English poems which privilege a male-perspective (1) through its manipulation of the conventions associated with courtly love poems and dream-visions, (2) by introducing innovations to the formal elements of rhyme royal poetry, and (3) by incorporating elements that position women rather than men as active agents in relationship to the concept of chastity.
This text, which is not listed in the Index of Middle English Verse (IMEV) (nor, to the best of my knowledge, elsewhere than in the Cotton catalogue description of the manuscript), appears to be the last lines of a rhyme royal stanza on the reign and death of King Harold, in the manner of John Lydgate's 'Verses on the Kings of England' (IMEV 3632).(11) The second stanza is an expression of the 'modesty topos', in a typically Lydgatian manner - with the clever twist of excusing the poor quality of the verse because Lydgate was not involved in the making of this poem.
In the Dali volume, as one might expect from the title, the range of reference stretches (in the first four of thirty-six poems reprinted here) from Japanese haiku to "Rhyme Royal for an Unknown Chinese Wine" to "Musee D'Orsay, Paris" to the title poem.