rhymed


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Related to rhymed: rhymer, Nursery rhymes

rhyme

also rime  (rīm)
n.
1. Correspondence of sounds at the ends of words or phrases, especially when involving the last stressed vowel and all succeeding sounds in each of two or more such words or phrases.
2. A word that exhibits such correspondence with another, as behold and cold.
3.
a. A poem or verse employing such correspondence as a formal feature, especially at the ends of lines.
b. Poetry or verse of this kind.
v. rhymed, rhym·ing, rhymes also rimed or rim·ing or rimes
v.intr.
1. To form a rhyme.
2. To compose rhymes or verse.
3. To make use of rhymes in composing verse.
v.tr.
1. To put into rhyme or compose with rhymes.
2. To use (a word or words) as a rhyme.

[Alteration (influenced by rhythm) of Middle English rime, from Old French, of Germanic origin; see ar- in Indo-European roots.]

rhymed

(raɪmd)
adj
(Poetry) constructed so as to rhyme
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.rhymed - having corresponding sounds especially terminal sounds; "rhymed verse"; "rhyming words"
rhymeless, rimeless, unrhymed, unrimed - not having rhyme; "writing unrhymed blank verse is like playing tennis without a net"
Translations

rhymed

[raɪmd] ADJrimado
References in classic literature ?
He had learnt his craft at the school of Alexander Pope, and he wrote moral stories in rhymed couplets.
Loving and perishing: these have rhymed from eternity.
Dobson offered the consensus view that rime riche "is not held to be admissible in English" because English verse, unlike French verse, requires sufficient contrast between the rhymed words:
The Art of the Rhymed Insult" (chapter two) explores hip hop's use of "diss" rhymes and the seemingly endless ability of rappers to deride adversaries in their lyrics.
Gasparov also discusses forms of rhymed poetry with highly irregular stanza-like organization, especially favored in Russia by the Romantics.
Li (1971) has argued that rhymed texts do not allow us to reconstruct CV-structured roots that do not rhyme with CVC roots.
It certainly cannot be denied that external impulses and influences have played a role that should not be overlooked (such as the influence of medieval Latin liturgical verse on the rhymed gospels of Otfrid and his followers), but the spontaneous development in the same direction [toward a more regular rhyme], principally from older forms of rhythmic-syntactic parallelism, is no less important.
3 : to cause lines or words to end with a similar sound <He rhymed "moon" with "June.