rhyming slang


Also found in: Thesaurus, Wikipedia.

rhy·ming slang

(rī′mĭng)
n.
Slang in which a word is replaced by a word or phrase that rhymes with it, as mate by China plate, often with the rhyming word being dropped from the phrase.

rhyming slang

n
slang in which a word is replaced by another word or phrase that rhymes with it; for example, apples and pears meaning stairs

rhym′ing slang`


n.
a form of slang in which a rhyming word or phrase is substituted for the word intended, often with ellipsis of the rhyming part, as titfer for tit for tat for hat.
[1855–60]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.rhyming slang - slang that replaces words with rhyming words or expressions and then typically omits the rhyming component; "Cockney rhyming slang"
jargon, lingo, patois, argot, vernacular, slang, cant - a characteristic language of a particular group (as among thieves); "they don't speak our lingo"
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
IN the seventies two TV drama comedy series hit the airways, Minder and The Sweeney, both set in London and both used the dialect and rhyming slang of the areas.
As Mick would say, in his cockney rhyming slang, there's a lot of Barney Rubble for the Carters this week.
Alum Rocks for socks is the only Birmingham place name used in rhyming slang, but we think there's room for a lot more.
EastEnders star Danny Dyer fears cockney rhyming slang is "dying out".
What creature in Australian rhyming slang is known as a noah?
I know you slaaags are probably abit scared of Danny Dyer but I'm afraid Mick Carter's cockney rhyming slang is getting proper out of H and.
comes from Cockney rhyming slang for the cartoon character Desperate Dan--which rhymes with can.
French poet and novelist Queneau (1903-1976), co-founder of the experimental writing group OULIPO, famously rewrote one anecdote about a man on a bus in 99 different rhetorical styles, from the sonnet to Cockney dialect, passive voice, official letter, haiku, rhyming slang, and Spoonerisms.
The Adidas b ll has been named The Albert, as in the Cockney rhy ing ball has been named The Albert, as in the Cockney rhyming slang Albert Hall, ball
London, July 6 ( ANI ): Our insatiable fascination with celebrities is helping reinvent the cockney rhyming slang, an ancient argot that many language experts feared was dying out.
Cockney Rhyming Slang is virtually impenetrable, even for other Britishers, but see if you can decipher this: "Had a barny with the trouble, so went for a ball of chalk down the rub a dub dub for a swift Aristotle of pig's ear and a rabbit to me old china Biffo.
No, while Ms Gillan has been restrained, all the tomfoolery has come from Jeremy Hunt, the Tory Culture Secretary and apparent piece of cockney rhyming slang.