rich rhyme

rich rhyme

n
(Poetry) prosody another term for rime riche
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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A rhyme is defined as rich if the same consonant precedes the rhyming vowels (e.g., strain/rain); on this definition, the category of rich rhyme encompasses "identical" (or tautological) rhymes in which the rhyming syllables have the same onset (write/right).
On the other hand, lines with rich rhyme are more likely to deviate from the metrical template than lines with poor rhyme, for the same reason.
At the level of relative value, we showed that rhyme and rhythm can be isomorphic: lines related by rich rhyme are more likely to have identical stress configurations than lines related by poor rhymes.
The other, isomorphic principle is reflected in the echoing pattern of deviations from the metrical template: lines associated by rich rhyme tend to share the same stress configuration.
Byline: Sarah Dale Reporter sarah.dale@trinitymirror.com SWATCH RICH RHYME
He describes the poet's work as labor-intensive and his success as producing lines that seem only "a moment's thought." (1) The poem itself mirrors the aesthetic principles it sets forth: its easy rhythms, conversational diction and rich rhyme words belie the technical difficulty of writing verse that is at once evocative and accessible.
OE y occurs as (e), long and short, in Suffolk, south-eastern Cambridgeshire and Essex, but hell ([less than] OE hyll) has a more limited distribution, and one wonders if that might be due to the avoidance in a place-name of a theological ambiguity exploited by William of Shoreham in a rich rhyme, EETS, e.s.
Ian Lilly's calculations produce these conclusions: (1) the eighteenth-century poet, Murav'ev, cultivated rich rhyme, which introduced new rhythmic pulses to Russian poetry, and these in turn created unavoidable semantic adjustments; (2) there is a greater similarity between adjacent feminine rhyme pairs than between non-adjacent ones (this is easily the most interesting of the conclusions; it amounts to a law of poetry and probably extends beyond Russia); (3) in binary AbAb lyrics there are distinct variations in vowel distribution as between rhyming and non-rhyming positions; (4) certain types of quatrain seem to predetermine theme and mood in Russian poetry.
However, upon closer examination it becomes evident that "parementz" and "instrumentz" are merely a rich rhyme pattern (CVC), only one step above the simple rhyme.
Here Chaucer provides the Knight with a more complex rich rhyme; however, the rhyme does not create the awkward feeling of the Squire's line; it is neither one in a string of overly complicated rhymes, nor is it a single polysyllabic rhyme amongst a sea of simple monosyllabic rhymes.
'Prison' and 'ranson' are rich rhymes in which the rhyme consists of a consonant sound followed by a vowel and then a concluding consonant sound.
There is variety of form in his verse, his preference turning to four-line stanzas with weak or rich rhymes during his mature years.