rick

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rick

 (rĭk)
n.
A stack of hay, straw, or similar material, especially when covered or thatched for protection from the weather.
tr.v. ricked, rick·ing, ricks
To pile into ricks.

[Middle English reke, from Old English hrēac.]

rick

(rɪk)
n
(Agriculture) a large stack of hay, corn, peas, etc, built in the open in a regular-shaped pile, esp one with a thatched top
vb
(Agriculture) (tr) to stack or pile into ricks
[Old English hrēac; related to Old Norse hraukr]

rick

(rɪk)
n
a wrench or sprain, as of the back
vb
(tr) to wrench or sprain (a joint, a limb, the back, etc)
[C18: see wrick]

rick

(rɪk)

n.
a large stack or pile of hay, straw, corn, or the like, in a field.
[before 900; Middle English rek(e), reek, Old English hrēac]

Rick

 a heap or pile; a stack of hay, corn, peas, etc., especially one built and thatched. See also mow.
Examples: rick of bricks, 1703; of coal, 1881; of corn, 1382; of grain; of peas; of snow, 1886; of straw, 1589; of wheat, 1557; hayrick, 1895.

rick


Past participle: ricked
Gerund: ricking

Imperative
rick
rick
Present
I rick
you rick
he/she/it ricks
we rick
you rick
they rick
Preterite
I ricked
you ricked
he/she/it ricked
we ricked
you ricked
they ricked
Present Continuous
I am ricking
you are ricking
he/she/it is ricking
we are ricking
you are ricking
they are ricking
Present Perfect
I have ricked
you have ricked
he/she/it has ricked
we have ricked
you have ricked
they have ricked
Past Continuous
I was ricking
you were ricking
he/she/it was ricking
we were ricking
you were ricking
they were ricking
Past Perfect
I had ricked
you had ricked
he/she/it had ricked
we had ricked
you had ricked
they had ricked
Future
I will rick
you will rick
he/she/it will rick
we will rick
you will rick
they will rick
Future Perfect
I will have ricked
you will have ricked
he/she/it will have ricked
we will have ricked
you will have ricked
they will have ricked
Future Continuous
I will be ricking
you will be ricking
he/she/it will be ricking
we will be ricking
you will be ricking
they will be ricking
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been ricking
you have been ricking
he/she/it has been ricking
we have been ricking
you have been ricking
they have been ricking
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been ricking
you will have been ricking
he/she/it will have been ricking
we will have been ricking
you will have been ricking
they will have been ricking
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been ricking
you had been ricking
he/she/it had been ricking
we had been ricking
you had been ricking
they had been ricking
Conditional
I would rick
you would rick
he/she/it would rick
we would rick
you would rick
they would rick
Past Conditional
I would have ricked
you would have ricked
he/she/it would have ricked
we would have ricked
you would have ricked
they would have ricked

Rick

1. Half a cord of firewood.
2. A stack of sticks of firewood or other wood that is eight feet long, four feet high, and as deep as the length of the sticks.
3. A small stack of hay.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.rick - a painful muscle spasm especially in the neck or back (`rick' and `wrick' are British)
Britain, Great Britain, U.K., UK, United Kingdom, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland - a monarchy in northwestern Europe occupying most of the British Isles; divided into England and Scotland and Wales and Northern Ireland; `Great Britain' is often used loosely to refer to the United Kingdom
cramp, muscle spasm, spasm - a painful and involuntary muscular contraction
2.Rick - a stack of hayrick - a stack of hay      
stack - an orderly pile
haycock - a small cone-shaped pile of hay that has been left in the field until it is dry enough to carry to the hayrick
Verb1.rick - pile in ricks; "rick hay"
pile, stack, heap - arrange in stacks; "heap firewood around the fireplace"; "stack your books up on the shelves"
2.Rick - twist suddenly so as to sprainrick - twist suddenly so as to sprain; "wrench one's ankle"; "The wrestler twisted his shoulder"; "the hikers sprained their ankles when they fell"; "I turned my ankle and couldn't walk for several days"
injure, wound - cause injuries or bodily harm to
Translations

rick

1 [rɪk] (Agr)
A. Nalmiar m
B. VTalmiarar, amontonar

rick

1
nSchober m

rick

[rɪk]
1. ncovone m, pagliaio
2. vt (Brit) (fam) (one's neck, back) → farsi uno strappo muscolare a
References in classic literature ?
Others had to tell of country people, coming in from neighbouring villages, who had seen great trees lying torn out of the earth, and whole ricks scattered about the roads and fields.
On Sundays he mostly lay all day on the sluice-gates, or stood against ricks and barns.
That rich undulating district of Loamshire to which Hayslope belonged lies close to a grim outskirt of Stonyshire, overlooked by its barren hills as a pretty blooming sister may sometimes be seen linked in the arm of a rugged, tall, swarthy brother; and in two or three hours' ride the traveller might exchange a bleak treeless region, intersected by lines of cold grey stone, for one where his road wound under the shelter of woods, or up swelling hills, muffled with hedgerows and long meadow-grass and thick corn; and where at every turn he came upon some fine old country-seat nestled in the valley or crowning the slope, some homestead with its long length of barn and its cluster of golden ricks, some grey steeple looking out from a pretty confusion of trees and thatch and dark-red tiles.
Nah--none dies here excep' falling off ricks and such.
Little details gave each field a particular physiognomy, dear to the eyes that have looked on them from childhood: the pool in the corner where the grasses were dank and trees leaned whisperingly; the great oak shadowing a bare place in mid-pasture; the high bank where the ash-trees grew; the sudden slope of the old marl-pit making a red background for the burdock; the huddled roofs and ricks of the homestead without a traceable way of approach; the gray gate and fences against the depths of the bordering wood; and the stray hovel, its old, old thatch full of mossy hills and valleys with wondrous modulations of light and shadow such as we travel far to see in later life, and see larger, but not more beautiful.
For his research, Ricks combed through more than 30,000 pages of documents and dozens of books, but most importantly he relied on the unexpurgated e-mails, letters, and notes from American military personnel, many of whom were outraged at the conduct of the war.
Ricks Natural Star failed in his bid to win back owner William Livingston's $40,000 entry fee to the Breeders' Cup Turf as he beat only one horse to finish sixth in an $8,000 starter-allowance race Friday at Los Alamitos Race Course.
The call is being webcast by Vcall and can be accessed at the Rick's Cabaret website, ricks.
Ricks pulls it all together--how the Bush administration, prodded by its neoconservative handmaidens, took us into an unnecessary war in a tinderbox country and region, and then screwed it up big time.
The horse, a 7-year-old named Ricks Natural Star, had a 2-for-23 record and lifetime earnings of $6,093.
When Platoon 3086 was deposited on Parris Island in 1995, Ricks was there, and he was still there eleven weeks later when those who had survived graduated into the Marines' elite ranks.
Cheers for last place: Ricks Natural Star came nowhere near winning the Breeders' Cup Turf.