rick

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rick

 (rĭk)
n.
A stack of hay, straw, or similar material, especially when covered or thatched for protection from the weather.
tr.v. ricked, rick·ing, ricks
To pile into ricks.

[Middle English reke, from Old English hrēac.]

rick

(rɪk)
n
(Agriculture) a large stack of hay, corn, peas, etc, built in the open in a regular-shaped pile, esp one with a thatched top
vb
(Agriculture) (tr) to stack or pile into ricks
[Old English hrēac; related to Old Norse hraukr]

rick

(rɪk)
n
a wrench or sprain, as of the back
vb
(tr) to wrench or sprain (a joint, a limb, the back, etc)
[C18: see wrick]

rick

(rɪk)

n.
a large stack or pile of hay, straw, corn, or the like, in a field.
[before 900; Middle English rek(e), reek, Old English hrēac]

Rick

 a heap or pile; a stack of hay, corn, peas, etc., especially one built and thatched. See also mow.
Examples: rick of bricks, 1703; of coal, 1881; of corn, 1382; of grain; of peas; of snow, 1886; of straw, 1589; of wheat, 1557; hayrick, 1895.

rick


Past participle: ricked
Gerund: ricking

Imperative
rick
rick
Present
I rick
you rick
he/she/it ricks
we rick
you rick
they rick
Preterite
I ricked
you ricked
he/she/it ricked
we ricked
you ricked
they ricked
Present Continuous
I am ricking
you are ricking
he/she/it is ricking
we are ricking
you are ricking
they are ricking
Present Perfect
I have ricked
you have ricked
he/she/it has ricked
we have ricked
you have ricked
they have ricked
Past Continuous
I was ricking
you were ricking
he/she/it was ricking
we were ricking
you were ricking
they were ricking
Past Perfect
I had ricked
you had ricked
he/she/it had ricked
we had ricked
you had ricked
they had ricked
Future
I will rick
you will rick
he/she/it will rick
we will rick
you will rick
they will rick
Future Perfect
I will have ricked
you will have ricked
he/she/it will have ricked
we will have ricked
you will have ricked
they will have ricked
Future Continuous
I will be ricking
you will be ricking
he/she/it will be ricking
we will be ricking
you will be ricking
they will be ricking
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been ricking
you have been ricking
he/she/it has been ricking
we have been ricking
you have been ricking
they have been ricking
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been ricking
you will have been ricking
he/she/it will have been ricking
we will have been ricking
you will have been ricking
they will have been ricking
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been ricking
you had been ricking
he/she/it had been ricking
we had been ricking
you had been ricking
they had been ricking
Conditional
I would rick
you would rick
he/she/it would rick
we would rick
you would rick
they would rick
Past Conditional
I would have ricked
you would have ricked
he/she/it would have ricked
we would have ricked
you would have ricked
they would have ricked

Rick

1. Half a cord of firewood.
2. A stack of sticks of firewood or other wood that is eight feet long, four feet high, and as deep as the length of the sticks.
3. A small stack of hay.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.rick - a painful muscle spasm especially in the neck or back (`rick' and `wrick' are British)
Britain, Great Britain, U.K., UK, United Kingdom, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland - a monarchy in northwestern Europe occupying most of the British Isles; divided into England and Scotland and Wales and Northern Ireland; `Great Britain' is often used loosely to refer to the United Kingdom
cramp, muscle spasm, spasm - a painful and involuntary muscular contraction
2.Rick - a stack of hayrick - a stack of hay      
stack - an orderly pile
haycock - a small cone-shaped pile of hay that has been left in the field until it is dry enough to carry to the hayrick
Verb1.rick - pile in ricks; "rick hay"
pile, stack, heap - arrange in stacks; "heap firewood around the fireplace"; "stack your books up on the shelves"
2.Rick - twist suddenly so as to sprainrick - twist suddenly so as to sprain; "wrench one's ankle"; "The wrestler twisted his shoulder"; "the hikers sprained their ankles when they fell"; "I turned my ankle and couldn't walk for several days"
injure, wound - cause injuries or bodily harm to
Translations

rick

1 [rɪk] (Agr)
A. Nalmiar m
B. VTalmiarar, amontonar

rick

1
nSchober m

rick

[rɪk]
1. ncovone m, pagliaio
2. vt (Brit) (fam) (one's neck, back) → farsi uno strappo muscolare a
References in classic literature ?
Adam walked round by the rick-yard, at present empty of ricks, to the little wooden gate leading into the garden--once the well- tended kitchen-garden of a manor-house; now, but for the handsome brick wall with stone coping that ran along one side of it, a true farmhouse garden, with hardy perennial flowers, unpruned fruit- trees, and kitchen vegetables growing together in careless, half- neglected abundance.
Little details gave each field a particular physiognomy, dear to the eyes that have looked on them from childhood: the pool in the corner where the grasses were dank and trees leaned whisperingly; the great oak shadowing a bare place in mid-pasture; the high bank where the ash-trees grew; the sudden slope of the old marl-pit making a red background for the burdock; the huddled roofs and ricks of the homestead without a traceable way of approach; the gray gate and fences against the depths of the bordering wood; and the stray hovel, its old, old thatch full of mossy hills and valleys with wondrous modulations of light and shadow such as we travel far to see in later life, and see larger, but not more beautiful.
They were busily "unhaling" the rick, that is, stripping off the thatch before beginning to throw down the sheaves; and while this was in progress Izz and Tess, with the other women-workers, in their whitey-brown pinners, stood waiting and shivering, Farmer Groby having insisted upon their being on the spot thus early to get the job over if possible by the end of the day.
The long strap which ran from the driving-wheel of his engine to the red thresher under the rick was the sole tie-line between agriculture and him.
The rick was unhaled by full daylight; the men then took their places, the women mounted, and the work began.
As Tess and the man who fed could never turn their heads she did not know that just before the dinner-hour a person had come silently into the field by the gate, and had been standing under a second rick watching the scene, and Tess in particular.
And a moment after she said, quickly, "I shall eat my dinner here--right on the rick.
Rick, if I had a hand to spare at present, I would give it you
Rick, my boy, Esther, my dear, what have you been doing?
However, Rick, Esther, and you too, Ada, for I don't know that even your little purse is safe from his inexperience--I must have a promise all round that nothing of this sort shall ever be done any more.
To be shelterless and alone in the open country, hearing the wind moan and watching for day through the whole long weary night; to listen to the falling rain, and crouch for warmth beneath the lee of some old barn or rick, or in the hollow of a tree; are dismal things--but not so dismal as the wandering up and down where shelter is, and beds and sleepers are by thousands; a houseless rejected creature.
He still, however, slept on, and did not awake till he found himself in the mouth of the cow; for the cook had put the hay into the cow's rick, and the cow had taken Tom up in a mouthful of it.