right to die


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right to die

n.
1. A person's right to refuse medical measures to prolong life, such as mechanical ventilation or hydration and nutrition, especially in the case of terminal illness.
2. The right of a person convicted of a capital crime to refuse to resist, such as through further appeals, the state's imposition of the death sentence.

right′-to-die′ adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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"Indeed it was: I had as good a right to die when my time came as he had: but I should bide that time, and not be hurried away in a suttee."
The marquis had been ill, and the marquis had died; he had as good a right to die as any one.
"To have the right to die would lift a cloud from over my head, knowing I wouldn't have to live an awful and prolonged existence.
PARIS, May 22 (KUNA) -- The right to live, or the right to die for a 42-year-old coma patient has sparked a furore here, involving doctors, French and European courts, the patients divided family and a UN Committee to protect rights of the handicapped, according to media, medical and legal sources on Wednesday.
It is illegal to help someone to die, but the pressure group Dignity in Dying says terminally ill people should have the right to die on their own terms.
The Indian judges said the right to die with dignity was a fundamental right and that an advance directive by a person in the form of a living will could be approved by the courts.
Recognising the right to die with dignity, the apex court said, "Human beings have the right to die with dignity."
The 1961 Act did not create a 'right' to commit suicide, and there is no right to die in any of the major human rights documents such as the 1948 Universal Declaration of Human Rights, and the 2006 Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities.
But the right to die law, proposed by Wolverhampton MP Rob Marris, provoked strong debate.
But the right to die law provoked strong debate before it was overwhelmingly rejected by MPs, with 330 MPs from across the Commons opposed the Assisted Dying Bill, while just 118 backed the proposals.
Mr Opperman had previously said he backed 'right to die' laws partly because people who could afford to go overseas, for example to clinics in Switzerland which offered the service, were already able to end their life.
OUR story about seriously ill grandfather Gordon Ross, 66, who went to Scotland's highest court yesterday to demand the right to die, provoked a largely sympathetic response from our online readers.