right to know

(redirected from right-to-know)

right to know

or right-to-know (rīt′tə-nō′)
adj.
Of or relating to policies and laws that make some governmental records and other information available to a person who can demonstrate a right or need to know the contents.
References in periodicals archive ?
A bipartisan measure that she is cosponsoring, the Taxpayers Right-To-Know Act, would require the federal government to make public the details, costs, and assessments related to every federal program.
The Union Leader filed a Right-To-Know request with the Nashua Police Department following the suicide, but was given a redacted report that withheld the name of the victim.
The Nashua Telegraph obtained the records through a Right-To-Know request.
The ad characterizes Lively as being opposed to "the community toxic right-to-know proposal," a program approved by Eugene voters in 1996.
facility, in violation of the federal right-to-know law.
CSPA proposes that a legislative or regulatory approach to "right-to-know" could build upon a voluntary consumer product ingredient communication initiative that became effective the first of this year.
Wiessmann said Pennsylvania's new right-to-know law required creation of the database, known as the Pennsylvania Contracts e-Library and available at www.treasurypa.org.
A citizen's dogged pursuit of information being withheld by a state agency was recently justified when a judge ruled that state officials knowingly violated the Right-to-Know Law.
Frank Pallone (D-NJ) and Hilda Solis (D-CA) announced the reintroduction of the Toxic Right-to-Know Protection Act (S.
Many agencies have investigated the impact of environmental and chemical exposures and the Right-to-Know about potential hazards in the workplace including chemical exposures.
To facilitate the evaluation of the colleges, there are now available data, through the Student Right-to-Know and Campus Security Act (1990), which amended the Higher Education Act, on every college's graduation rate for fall semester cohorts of first-time, fulltime (FTFT) students in degree programs.
Your city's right-to-know report (also called the consumer confidence report) examines your drinking water and anything else lurking in it.