right-to-work law


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right-to-work law

(rīt′tə-wûrk′)
n.
A state law or constitutional provision that prohibits the use of labor union membership as a criterion for hiring or continued employment.
References in periodicals archive ?
Tennessees workforce, central location, our right-to-work law, our top-notch roads, and our state leadership have all contributed to Tennessees ability to create and expand good paying automotive jobs.
This is a state that was once was a bulwark of industrial unionism--the United Auto Workers union was founded there--but now has a Right-to-Work law and political climate that is hostile toward unions.
In Michigan, the governor signed a bill that ended payroll deductions for public school employees in 2012 - the year before the state passed a right-to-work law - but it's unclear how that specific measure impacted union membership since it went into effect amid other labor reforms.
html) decades-long push from Republicans and businesses, the Show-Me State became the 28th state to enact a right-to-work law.
Walker instituted a series of conservative reforms in Wisconsin, including major tax cuts, a right-to-work law that makes union dues voluntary instead of mandatory, a tightening of abortion laws and reining in of state regulations.
The advertising guru promoting that law was murdered the night of July 9, 1976 with a shotgun blast outside his hotel in Baton Rouge as the controversy about the Right-to-Work law continued.
But the right-to-work law is a signal that public policy is not dominated by the redistributionists, and that is a very important signal.
In an update of a question asked in 1957, 71% of Americans said they would "vote for" a right-to-work law if they had the opportunity to do so, while 22% said they would vote against such a law.
Indiana's right-to-work law is now under Supreme Court review after legal battles.
IN DECEMBER OF LAST YEAR, the American state of Michigan--the birthplace of the UAW and the sit-down strikes of the 1930s that ushered in industrial unionism in North America--became the 24th state to pass a right-to-work law.
Some experts see Michigan's right-to-work law as a blow to the state's Democratic Party, as unions have historically been a major source of support for liberals.
5) True or False: The 7th Circuit upheld the constitutionality of Wisconsin's controversial right-to-work law, the same law that led to the attempted recall of Governor Scott Walker.