rightless


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rightless

(ˈraɪtləs)
adj
lacking rights
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
In this regard, we are rightless citizens and can not protect our rights and freedom on par with the government," the activists said.
She discusses how policymakers in the European Union frame migrants as rightless beings who lack the protection of the international community; migrants' journeys from their countries of origin to Morocco; how they arrive there; their image of themselves when stuck there, as well as how they view each other; and strategies they use to revolt against conditions they find themselves in by attempting to leave the country.
Seeking to establish universal principles and values worth protecting in shielding refugees from harm aims to prevent situations where stateless people become, in Arendt's words, "rightless" (33) and are therefore exposed to every arbitrariness imaginable.
The stateless were rightless in the sense that they were deprived of legal personhood as well as the right to action and speech.
These disruptions felt on very personal levels by the refugees themselves seem to be entirely disconnected from the anonymous "stateless" and "rightless" person that the political system of modern nation-states produces--as Arendt explores in her Origins of Totalitarianism (Arendt 1979; also Bashir and Goldberg 2014, 90-93).
Yet, in the following clause, he asks his readers to relegate "a la obscuridad de sus autores la infame doctrina que vale mas la esclavitud en que uno ha nacido que un Gobierno libre, independiente y administrado por unos hombres virtuosos elegidos por vuestro sufragio, y responsables de su conducta," a juxtaposition that posits "slavery" as a metaphorical opposite of "free government," that is, as a form of rightless social death (181).
Arendt (1973, 293-294) contends that "the stateless" means nothing but "the rightless" because people lost both their home and government protection.
The pattern of thought is this: to be ruined is to be worthless; to be worthless is to be rightless. European punishment is again structured quite precisely to deny these claims.
No paradox of contemporary politics is filled with a more poignant irony than the discrepancy between the efforts of well-meaning idealists who stubbornly insist on regarding as "inalienable" those human rights, which are enjoyed by citizens of the most prosperous and civilized countries, and the situation of the rightless themselves....
As she writes, "the first loss that the rightless suffered was ...
Giving standing to beings long considered non-sentient and without any direct control over their own lives might also seem anathematic to the wider community-according to Professor Stone 'until the rightless thing receives its rights, we cannot see it as anything but a thing for the use of ...