rigid designator

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rigid designator

n
(Logic) logic an expression that identifies the same individual in every possible world: for example, "Shakespeare" is a rigid designator since it is possible that Shakespeare might not have been a playwright but not that he might not have been Shakespeare
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References in periodicals archive ?
taken to be rigid designators. L) is taken to be false because it is
This essay shows that predicativism does not have this consequence by showing that incomplete definite descriptions in general and incomplete denuded descriptions, such as "0 the Ivan," in particular are rigid designators.
According to Kripke, "proper names are rigid designators," and
As is well known, the two theses that some singular terms, paradigmatically names, are rigid designators, and that some predicative expressions, particularly natural kind ones, could also be taken as rigid, originate in Kripke's introduction of the notion of rigidity in Naming and Necessity (Kripke 1980).
The division into essential and contingent properties enables him to introduce the concept of rigid designator. He defines rigid designators as expressions pointing out the same objects or the same kinds of objects in every possible world.
[section]640), thus they cannot be rigid designators. Peirce's emphasis on the interpretant runs counter to the essentialist core of the causal account, as it hinges on the commonality of experience of speaker and listener.
An expression is rigid de jure if it is rigid in virtue of belonging to a class of expressions that are rigid designators. Proper names are as rigid de jure (their semantics is such that they refer rigidly to their bearers).
First, the exemplarism foundational to Z.'s argument draws on the theory of direct reference associated with Saul Kripke and Hilary Putnam whereby words serve as rigid designators through ostension.
Neither encourages the radical democratization of naming that already is under way in the names that theorists give to political life because names are all too often depoliticized as rigid designators that bear only the limited understanding that our discourses seem to permit.
Following Kripke, Lyotard holds proper names to be "rigid designators" (Lyotard: "Antisthenes Notice," p.
On the other hand, suppose that "a" and "b" are both rigid designators. In that case, it seems, "a=b" cannot be contingently true.
The identity statement is necessary, because it is expressed by means of presumably rigid designators, disallowing transworld referential variance.