rimy


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rime 1

 (rīm)
n.
1. A white incrustation of ice formed when supercooled water droplets freeze almost instantly on contact with a solid surface.
2. A coating, as of mud or slime, likened to a frosty film: "A meal couldn't leave us feeling really full unless it laid down a rime of fat globules in our mouths and stomachs" (James Fallows).
tr.v. rimed, rim·ing, rimes
To cover with or as if with frost or ice: "heavy [shoes] rimed with mud and cement ... from the building site" (Seamus Deane).

[Middle English rim, from Old English hrīm.]

rim′y adj.

rime 2

 (rīm)
n. & v.
Variant of rhyme.

rimy

(ˈraɪmɪ)
adj, rimier or rimiest
(Physical Geography) coated with rime
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.rimy - covered with frost; "a frosty glass"; "hedgerows were rimed and stiff with frost"-Wm.Faulkner
cold - having a low or inadequate temperature or feeling a sensation of coldness or having been made cold by e.g. ice or refrigeration; "a cold climate"; "a cold room"; "dinner has gotten cold"; "cold fingers"; "if you are cold, turn up the heat"; "a cold beer"
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References in classic literature ?
IN little more than a month after that meeting on the hill--on a rimy morning in departing November--Adam and Dinah were married.
There were three other couples, following the bride and bridegroom: first, Martin Poyser, looking as cheery as a bright fire on this rimy morning, led quiet Mary Burge, the bridesmaid; then came Seth serenely happy, with Mrs.
Rimy gave a grin, Mercier a sigh and seemed about to speak...but, meeting Gabriel's eye, said nothing.
I smell the fog that hung about the place; I see the hoar frost, ghostly, through it; I feel my rimy hair fall clammy on my cheek; I look along the dim perspective of the schoolroom, with a sputtering candle here and there to light up the foggy morning, and the breath of the boys wreathing and smoking in the raw cold as they blow upon their fingers, and tap their feet upon the floor.
He thought of the times he had seen the brother and sister together in deep converse over one of his own old college books; now, in the rimy mornings, when he made those sharpening pilgrimages to Cloisterham Weir; now, in the sombre evenings, when he faced the wind at sunset, having climbed his favourite outlook, a beetling fragment of monastery ruin; and the two studious figures passed below him along the margin of the river, in which the town fires and lights already shone, making the landscape bleaker.
When she had dressed herself with much shuddering and chattering, they allayed their internal discomfort by a slender meal of biscuits, got their skates, and went out across the rimy meadows, past patient cows breathing clouds of steam, to Wickens's pond.